Loi Pinel : The Arts of the Present

October 26–28, 2020
HOSTED BY THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY
AT THE OAKLAND MARRIOTT CITY CENTER

REGISTER FOR ASAP/9

Early registration discounts end on October 6.

Participants and presenters at ASAP/9 can join ASAP and register for the conference by following the links below. They will take you to separate sites at Johns Hopkins Press where you can complete the registration process.

We ask all those attending ASAP/9 to join the organization. ASAP members have access to our listserv, can take part in elections and prize competitions, and receive an annual subscription to our award-winning ASAP/Journal. You can also find out more about ASAP at our website.

There is no additional charge for the three conference events you will see listed on the registration site. But since seating is limited, please reserve your ticket(s) for the additional event(s) you would like to attend.

For assistance with membership or registration, please contact JHUP customer service at: 1-800- 548-1784

There are no reduced fees for participants wishing to attend only part of the conference.

Registrants who cancel at least 30 days prior to the conference start date will receive a full refund, less a $40 processing fee. No refunds can be offered within 30 days of the conference. Refunds will not be given to no-shows. Substitutions are permitted.

To request a refund, please contact Robert White-Goodman

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

Films by Kevin Jerome Everson and Edgar Arceneaux

Thursday, October 26 / 7:30 pm / BAMPFA, Berkeley
Kevin Jerome Everson, Edgar Arceneaux, and Michael B. Gillespie in conversation

Kevin Jerome Everson
Kevin Jerome Everson works in film, painting, sculpture, and photography. His filmic fables, the focus of this exhibition, articulate the profound within the ordinariness of everyday life. Everson, who was born in the working-class community of Mansfield, Ohio, depicts details in the lives of people living and working in similar American communities: a mechanic repairing an old car in a backyard, a black beauty queen in a segregated pageant, men boxing, snowplow operators in winter, young men walking into a courtroom, the aftermath of a murder. Some of Everson’s films are constructed from appropriated news and film footage, uncovering forgotten details of African-American life in the 1960s and 70s. In other films, the artist explores the waxing and waning of a community’s sense of itself and the migration of black people from the South to the North in order to find work. Everson, whose work was included in the 2008 Whitney Biennial, approaches race, sexuality, and economic circumstances with a poetic yet unflinching eye. Adopting the stance of an observer, his interest in labor has both a political and a formal aspect, exploring the relationship between the human body and the materiality of the labor it performs as both an expression of class and identity, and as a performative gesture.

Edgar Arceneaux
Edgar Arceneaux was born in Los Angeles in 1972. He investigates historical patterns through drawings, installations, and multimedia events, such as the reenactment of Ben Vereen’s tragically misunderstood blackface performance at Ronald Reagan’s 1981 Inaugural Gala. In the artist’s work, linear logic is abandoned in favor of wordplay and visual associations, revealing how language, technology, and systems of ordering produce reality as much as describe them. Seemingly disparate elements—such as science fiction, civil rights era speeches, techno music, and the crumbling architecture of Detroit—find a new synchronicity in the artist’s hands, ultimately pointing to largerwas born in Los Angeles in 1972. He investigates historical patterns through drawings, installations, and multimedia events, such as the reenactment of Ben Vereen’s tragically misunderstood blackface performance at Ronald Reagan’s 1981 Inaugural Gala. In the artist’s work, linear logic is abandoned in favor of wordplay and visual associations, revealing how language, technology, and systems of ordering produce reality as much as describe them. Seemingly disparate elements—such as science fiction, civil rights era speeches, techno music, and the crumbling architecture of Detroit—find a new synchronicity in the artist’s hands, ultimately pointing to larger historical forces such as the rise of the surveillance state. Arceneaux’s installations have taken the form of labyrinths, libraries, multi-channel videos, and drawn landscapes that change over the course of an exhibition, only ever offering a partial view of the whole at any given moment. This fragmentation extends to the artist’s use of historical research in his work, such as FBI documents concerning civil rights leader Martin Luther King, Jr., where redacted passages are presented on mirrors that reflect the viewer’s curious gaze.

Michael B. Gillespie
Michael B. Gillespie is a film theorist and historian with an interest in black visual and expressive culture, film theory, genre, visual historiography, global cinema, adaptation theory, popular music studies, and contemporary art. His recent book, Film Blackness: American Cinema and the Idea of Black Film (Duke University Press, 2016) frames black film alongside literature, music, art, photography, and new media, treating it as an interdisciplinary form that enacts black visual and expressive culture. The book shifts the ways we think about black film, treating it not as a category, genre, or strictly a representation of the black experience but as a visual negotiation between film as art and the discursivity of race.

Rachel Kushner in Conversation with Julia Bryan Wilson

Friday, October 27 / 6:00-7:30 pm
James Moore Theater, Oakland Museum of California

Rachel Kushner
Rachel Kushner is among America’s most exciting writers. Her novels and essays explore contemporary art, culture, revolutionary politics, modernism, and feminism with unmatched wisdom and grace.
She has twice been a finalist for the National Book Award and is a Guggenheim Fellow. Her fiction and essays appear regularly in the New York Times, The Paris Review, The Believer, Artforum, Bookforum, Fence, Bomb, and Grand Street.
Rachel’s first novel, Telex from Cuba, intertwines revolution in 1950’s Cuba and visceral human interactions with a revelatory, deft hand. In a starred review, Kirkus Reviews called it “Soundly researched and gorgeously written.” A New York Times bestseller and a finalist for both the National Book Award and the Dayton Literary Peace Prize, it was a winner of the California Book Award.
Her incendiary work, The Flamethrowers, was a finalist for The National Book Award and was named one of the Top Ten Books of the year by The New York Times. It is celebrated as a modern classic. Rachel’s work continues to garner acclaim among her contemporaries like few other authors in recent history. In their review The New York Times proclaimed, “…her prose has a poise and wariness and moral graininess that puts you in mind of weary-souled visionaries like Robert Stone and Joan Didion.”

Julia Bryan-Wilson
Julia Bryan-Wilson teaches modern and contemporary art, with a focus on art since 1960 in the US, Europe, and Latin America; she is also the Director of the UC Berkeley Arts Research Center. Her research interests include theories of artistic labor, feminist and queer theory, performance, production/fabrication, craft histories, photography, video, visual culture of the nuclear age, and collaborative practices. She is the author of Art Workers: Radical Practice in the Vietnam War Era (University of California Press, 2009); Art in the Making: Artists and Their Materials from the Studio to Crowdsourcing (with Glenn Adamson, Thames & Hudson, 2016); and Fray: Art and Textile Politics (University of Chicago, 2017). With Andrea Andersson, she curated Cecilia Vicuña: About to Happen, which opened at the Contemporary Arts Center New Orleans in 2017 and will travel to the Berkeley Art Museum, the Henry Art Gallery, and the ICA in Philadelphia. She is currently writing a book about Louise Nevelson.
She was a recipient of a Creative Capital/Andy Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant, and has won several awards for her teaching. She was the Terra Foundation Visiting Professor of American Art at the Courtauld Institute of Art in Spring 2014, and from fall 2014 to spring 2015 she was a Townsend Center for the Humanities Associate Professor Fellow. In 2017 she was a Visiting Senior Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery in Washington, DC.

Featured Panels

The program committee has assembled a list of featured panels and roundtables that crystallize some of the topics and concerns that emerged with particular vibrancy as ASAP/9 came together. Some of these panels speak with great clarity on pressing aspects of the global political moment; others assess the history of the present and speculate on its potential legacies; others invite us to engage the present from new methodological and theoretical perspectives. The program committee hopes that these panels will generate lively conversations at this year’s conference.

  1. Pacific Racial Time: State, Racial, and Aesthetic Forms
Chair: Sunny Xiang, Yale University

  1. The Greatest American Novel of the 21st Century (roundtable)
Chair: Min Song, Boston College

  1. New Directions in Latin/o American Art: Projects from Pacific Standard Time LA/LA
Chair: Natalia Brizuela, Associate Professor, UC Berkeley

  1. Against Endtimes: Continuity as Critique (roundtable)
Chair: Amy Elias, University of Tennessee

  1. Artist’s Talk: Favianna Rodriguez in Conversation with Tatiana Flores
  2. The Los Angeles Review of Books at Six (roundtable)
Chair: Sara Marcus, Princeton University

  1. Prehistory of a Museum of Capitalism (curators panel and discussion)
Chair: Christopher Chen, University of California, Santa Cruz

  1. In Terms of Performance (roundtable)
Chair: Shannon Jackson, University of California, Berkeley

  1. Disposable Bodies: Reading the Figure of the Muslim and the Refugee in Contemporary Culture
Chair: Zahid R. Chaudhary, Princeton University

  1. Commune Editions: “Period Style and the Art of the Present”

VENUES & LOCAL INFORMATION

We are looking forward to seeing you all in Oakland and Berkeley for ASAP/9. Information about airport transportation to downtown Oakland and about our conference venues can be found below.

MAIN VENUE

Our main venue is the Oakland Marriott City Center, where all panels, roundtables, and seminars will be held. There will be a floorplan for the hotel and its meetings rooms in the final program.
If you’re staying at the Marriott or elsewhere in downtown Oakland, you can take BART (Bay Area Rapid Transit) from either Oakland International Airport or San Francisco International Airport (SFO).

BART DIRECTIONS

From SFO: board the Pittsburg/Bay Point train to 12th Street / Oakland City Station and you’ll be right in downtown just a block from the Marriott, and a few blocks from Oakland Chinatown and Jack London Square.
From Oakland International Airport: board the BART airtrain to the Coliseum station and transfer to the orange Richmond line; get off at 12th Street / Oakland City Center. The station is one block north of the Oakland Marriott.
For more on BART service to and from Oakland or SFO, please see the “Airport Connections Guide”.
Note: The last North-bound train from SFO leaves at 11:54 pm; the last train from Oakland International Airport leaves at12:43 am.
Cab fare from SFO to downtown Oakland is rarely less than $85.00, and can be higher with traffic. Cab fare from Oakland International Airport to downtown Oakland is $40.00 and up.

THURSDAY, BAMPFA

Thursday evening’s keynote screening and discussion will be held at the BAMPFA (Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive; general information here.) The BAMPFA is accessible by BART from the Oakland Marriott and is just one block east from the Downtown Berkeley station.
From the 12th Street / Oakland City Center station, board a train on either the northbound “Richmond” or “Warm Springs” line and get off at Downtown Berkeley. Walk east on Center Street and the BAMPFA is on the northwest corner of Center and Oxford.

FRIDAY, JAMES MOORE THEATER

Friday evening’s keynote conversation will be held at the James Moore Theater in the Oakland Museum of California (general information here.)
The Oakland Museum is about seven blocks southeast of the Oakland Marriott.

ACCOMMODATIONS

At this time, there is very limited availability at the Oakland Marriott City Center for Thursday, Friday, and Saturday at the conference rate, and another event taking place in the city is making it impossible for the hotel to offer additional rooms at a discount. (Our block for Wednesday has sold out.) Please reserve a room for any nights you can to take advantage of the conference rate. There may be rooms available at the Oakland Marriott on various travel and booking sites at rates below what you’re likely to be quoted directly, but the Marriott is unable to hold a block of these rooms for ASAP/9.
The Oakland Marriott City Center will be the site of most ASAP/9 sessions, with the exception of our evening keynote events on Thursday and Friday. The hotel is centrally located downtown, near Old Oakland, Uptown, Oakland Chinatown, Jack London Square, and Lake Merritt. There is a BART (public transportation) station right across the street from the hotel, with train access to Oakland International Airport and SFO.

Oakland Overflow Accommodations

Several hotels nearby have availability for the nights of the conference. Right across the street from the main conference hotel, there is a Courtyard by Marriott. As with the Marriott City Center, you’re likely to find a better rate on various travel sites than you’ll get from the hotel directly.

Two hotels in Jack London Square are within walking distance of the Oakland Marriott. We aren’t able to reserve blocks of rooms at either hotel but have confirmed that they have availability during the conference. The Z Hotel is slightly closer to the Marriott, while the Waterfront Hotel is right on the bay, but still within a 15-minute walk of the conference hotel.

The Clarion Hotel is just a couple blocks way from the Marriott, and they also have availability for the dates of the conference. This is a reasonably-priced option.

Three additional hotels with rooms available are close to downtown, but not within easy walking distance of the Marriott. The Inn @ Temescal is located at the south end of Oakland’s Temescal neighborhood, and has excellent public transportation options (BART and bus) to downtown. The Best Western Plus Bayside Hotel and the Executive Inn & Suites are both located on Oakland’s Embarcadero Waterfront. They are a couple miles from the Marriott, but offer free shuttles to downtown, and to Oakland International Airport.

Berkeley and Emeryville

The Hotel Shattuck Plaza is centrally located in downtown Berkeley and is very close to campus, and to the Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, the site of our keynote event Thursday night. It’s a short subway ride from the Oakland Marriott, and has convenient public transportation access to Oakland International Airport and SFO. The Graduate Hotel in Berkeley is also close to campus, but is a longer walk to BART (train).

There are several large hotels in Emeryville, only ten minutes away from downtown Oakland by taxi or Lyft. You can find out more about several of them here, and we will be happy to answer any questions we can about local transportation options.

Finally, since we know that some people will be staying in, or visiting San Francisco as well, a reminder that the Oakland Marriott is located at the 12th Street BART station. Trains to San Francisco run regularly until around 1:00 am.

Loi Pinel

What is the Pinel 2020 law?

The dispositif Pinel is part of the incentive laws for rental investment in order to support real estate construction. In the French political landscape, it is a habit to offer tax advantages, such as tax reductions to relaunch the construction of new residences in France.

You can reduce part of your tax by 12, 18 or 21% of the amount of your investment over a respective period of 6, 9 or 12 years.

The Pinel system was presented by Manuel Valls, Prime Minister, and Sylvia Pinel, Minister of Housing, on August 31, 2014. The law officially entered into force on January 1, 2015 (with retroactive effect). It is devoted to new rental investment but has an environmental and social component. The law is aimed at all French people wishing to invest in new housing, even without contribution.

With an investment limited to € 300,000 per year, you can save up to € 63,000! If you want to know more, depending on your project: make a Pinel simulation or ask for your Loi Pinel guide .

What are the advantages of the Pinel 2020 law?

The first advantage of the Pinel law is undoubtedly its tax reduction of 12, 18 or 21% which is proportional to the number of years during which you agree to rent your property, 6, 9 or 12 years.With the device, you also have the possibility of renting your property to your ascendants or descendants , that is to say either to your parents or your children.The law also allows you to become an owner without contribution . Your purchase is reimbursed by the rents paid each month as well as by the tax benefit.Investing in rental real estate is also a way to prepare for retirement by building up your assets and providing for a monthly income through rent.

What are the eligibility conditions?

Choose your property well
It is essential to choose your property well and in particular its geographical location before investing in Pinel law: it must be located in zones A bis, A or B1. These are areas where rental demand is particularly strong. Zones B2 and C are also eligible with an exemption.

Respect the ceilings

To tax exemption, the investor must also respect rent ceilings, depending on the area in which the property is located. The owner must also rent to individuals whose income does not exceed a certain limit.

To take advantage of the tax reduction, your property must:

Be new, rehabilitated or sold in the future state of completion (VEFA)
Rented unfurnished
Rented as principal residence
Respect the energy performance and technical standards in force, such as the BBC 2005 label and RT 2012. These labels set a maximum consumption target and aim to reduce the ecological impact of buildings on the environment. Your property will not be “energy intensive” and will allow you to save energy.
Be in one of the zones determined by the device . Thus, Ile-de-France is in zone A bis, large metropolitan areas in zone A, cities with more than 250,000 inhabitants, as well as certain coastal cities and northern Corsica, in zone B1. Municipalities with between 50,000 and 250,000 inhabitants are in zone B2.
Rented to tenants not exceeding the resource ceilings, determined according to the area where your property is located.
Rented according to the rent ceilings fixed by the system , according to the geographic division where your accommodation is located.

The tax declaration is carried out in several stages:

Complete the rental commitment (declaration 2044-EB) which certifies to the tax authorities that you agree to rent your property for a minimum of 6 years.Drafting of a property balance sheet (declaration 2044 or 2044-SPE) which corresponds to the rents received, the charges, the fees and the taxes deducted. Your balance sheet will be in land profit or in land deficit. Depending on the amount obtained, this will be added to or deducted from your overall taxable income.The tax advantage of the Pinel law: note the annual tax reduction under the heading: “charges giving rise to tax reduction” (declaration 2042 - C).Remember to keep the declaration of completion (DAT) and all tenants' leases. In case of control, these documents will be precious to you.

The Arts of the Present - Document PDF Transcription

HOSTED BY THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY
AT THE OAKLAND MARRIOTT CITY CENTER
Sponsored by
The Department of English, University of California, Berkeley; the Arts + Design
Initiative at UC Berkeley; the Division of Arts and Humanities, University of
California, Berkeley; the Arts Research Center, University of California, Berkeley;
and the Townsend Center for the Humanities, University of California, Berkeley.
With additional support from
The Department of English, Pomona College; the Association for the Study
of the Arts of the Present; ASAP/Journal; the Center for British Studies,
University of California, Berkeley; the Center for New Media, University of
California, Berkeley; the Institute of European Studies, University of California,
Berkeley; the Holloway Series in Poetry, University of California, Berkeley; and
the Departments of Art Practice, East Asian Languages and Culture, Film and
Media, and Music at the University of California, Berkeley.
2
welcome to ASAP/9: The Arts of the Present, the
ninth annual meeting of the Association
for the Study of the Arts of the Present.
We are delighted to be hosting you for this year’s conference in Oakland and Berkeley. We hope
that your time in the East Bay allows you to visit some of the many institutions—large and small—
where the contemporary arts are doing their work. We are especially happy that the conference’s
keynote events will take us to the recently reopened Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
and the Oakland Museum of California. But there are countless other sites in the Bay Area where
questions that this conference explores are being asked in different terms and media: What roles
can we imagine for the arts in relation to forms of social action and political resistance now? What
can artists and scholars do to sustain and support their work in the face of new restrictions on
intellectual inquiry, expression, and movement? What conditions of risk and precarity inform artistic
practice, reception, and community?
The breadth and richness of ASAP/9 embraces a truly inspiring diversity of approaches to the arts
of the present. This is our largest conference ever, and reflects a growing sense of ASAP’s centrality
as a multidisciplinary place to talk with each other about the texts, objects, images, performances,
politics, films, and technologies that matter most to us. In keeping with ASAP’s emphasis on
moving across, between, and flexibly within disciplines and national traditions, this year’s program
committee has tried to put together a conference that speaks to the ways that we’ve been forced to
think about everything that has and has not changed about the contemporary world over the past
year.
The credit for this thinking goes to you and to the work you’re bringing to Oakland. The
submissions for this year’s conference were numerous and intellectually impressive. We look
forward to the conversations that will start here in Oakland and sustain us for future ASAP
conferences and symposia.
In addition to ASAP/9’s keynote events with Edgar Arceneaux, Julia Bryan-Wilson, Kevin Jerome
Everson, Michael B. Gillespie, and Rachel Kushner, the program committee also has put together
a list of featured panels and roundtables that crystallized some of the topics and concerns we
saw emerging with particular vibrancy. Some of these panels speak with great clarity on pressing
aspects of the global political moment; others assess the history of the present and speculate on its
potential legacies; others invite us to engage the present from new methodological and theoretical
perspectives. All of them exemplify how ASAP, since its founding and first conference almost ten
years ago, has tried to bring ideas about the arts together.
We wish to thank all of the institutions and people who have made ASAP/9 possible. We are
deeply grateful to our hosts and sponsors for their support, and appreciate the generosity of the
UC Berkeley community at a time when the public mission of the university remains at financial and
political risk. Our Thursday keynote screening would not be happening without the energy and
spirit of Michael B. Gillespie and film curator Kathy Geritz, who has been ingenious and supportive
with her time, resources, and imagination. Our thanks to Philina Lim at the Oakland Marriott, and
to Joemari Cedo and Jennifer Holland in Berkeley’s English department for providing wonderful
logistical support. Jane Hu, ASAP/9’s graduate assistant, has kept things running smoothly behind
the scenes, and has been instrumental in organizing all the other graduate student volunteers.
3
Monte Holman’s design work—online and in the program you’re reading now—has been timely and
impeccable. And while the ASAP Motherboard operates with remarkable collectivity, the program
committee would like to thank Gloria Fisk, Angela Naimou, and Lisa Uddin individually for crucial
help along the way.
Yours,
Weihong Bao, Natalia Brizuela, Mark Goble, Yogita Goyal, Evan Kindley, Steven Lee, Katherine
Snyder
ASAP/9 Organizers and Program Committee
President:
Mark Goble, University of California, Berkeley
Vice-President:
Joseph Jeon, Pomona College
2nd Vice-President:
Yogita Goyal, University of California, Los Angeles
Past President:
Jonathan P. Eburne, The Pennsylvania State University
Members-at-Large:
Sarah Evans, Northern Illinois University
Lisa Uddin, Whitman College
Secretary-Communications:
Gloria Fisk, Queens College, CUNY (assumed office fall 2015)
Treasurer:
Angela Naimou, Clemson University (assumed office fall 2016)
Journal Editors-in-chief:
Jonathan P. Eburne, The Pennsylvania State University
Amy J. Elias, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Founding President:
Amy Elias, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
ASAP motherboard (2016–17)
4
ASAP/9 conference overview
The Arts of the Present, October 26-28, 2017
Hosted by the University of California, Berkeley at the Oakland Marriott City Center
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 25
2:00–6:00pm Registration
Junior Ballroom Foyer, 2nd Floor
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 26
8:00–8:30am Light breakfast and Registration
Junior Ballroom Foyer, 2nd Floor
8:30–10:00am Session 1
9:00am–5:00pm Book Exhibit
Junior Ballroom Foyer, 2nd Floor
10:15–11:45am Session 2
11:45am–1:15pm Break for lunch
1:15–2:30pm Session 3
2:45–4:15pm Session 4
4:30–6:00pm Session 5
7:30pm Keynote: Films by Edgar Arceneaux and Kevin Jerome Everson
at the Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, Berkeley
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 27
8:30–9:00am Light breakfast and Registration
Junior Ballroom Foyer, 2nd Floor
9:00am–5:00pm Book Exhibit
Junior Ballroom Foyer, 2nd Floor
9:00–10:30am Session 6
10:45am–12:15pm Session 7
12:15–1:30pm ASAP Members and Awards Lunch,
Skyline Room, 21st Floor, Oakland Marriott
1:30–3:00pm Session 8
3:15–4:45pm Session 9
6:00–7:30pm Keynote: Rachel Kushner in conversation with Julia Bryan-Wilson
at the Oakland Museum of California, James Moore Theater
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 28
8:00–8:30am Light breakfast and Registration
Junior Ballroom Foyer, 2nd Floor
8:30–10:00am Session 10
9:00am–5:00pm Book Exhibit
Junior Ballroom Foyer, 2nd Floor
10:15–11:45am Session 11
11:45am–1:15pm Break for lunch
1:15–2:30pm Session 12
2:45–4:15pm Session 13
4:30–6:00pm Session 14
6:00–7:30pm Closing Reception: Hosted by Pomona College’s Department of English
and ASAP/Journal, Skyline Room, 21st Floor, Oakland Marriott
CONFERENCE OVERVIEW

  1. Pacific Racial Time: State, Racial, and
Aesthetic Forms
Chair: Sunny Xiang, Yale University
  1. The Greatest American Novel of the
21st Century (roundtable)
Chair: Min Song, Boston College
  1. New Directions in Latin/o American Art:
Projects from Pacific Standard Time LA/LA
Chair: Natalia Brizuela, Associate
Professor, UC Berkeley
  1. Against Endtimes: Continuity as
Critique (roundtable)
Chair: Amy Elias, University of Tennessee
  1. Artist’s Talk: Favianna Rodriguez in
Conversation with Tatiana Flores
  1. The Los Angeles Review of Books at Six
(roundtable)
Chair: Sara Marcus, Princeton University
  1. Prehistory of a Museum of Capitalism
(curators panel and discussion)
Chair: Christopher Chen, University of
California, Santa Cruz
  1. In Terms of Performance (roundtable)
Chair: Shannon Jackson, University of
California, Berkeley
  1. Disposable Bodies: Reading the
Figure of the Muslim and the Refugee in
Contemporary Culture
Chair: Zahid R. Chaudhary, Princeton
University
  1. Commune Editions: “Period Style and
the Art of the Present”
FEATURED PANELS
The program committee hopes that these panels will generate lively conversations across the
broad range of issues and interests at this year’s conference.
6
ASAP/9 VENUES
Oakland Marriott City Center Floorplans
Level 2
7
ASAP/9 VENUES
Downtown Oakland Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
(Thursday keynote)
James Moore Theater, Oakland Museum of California (Friday keynote)
8
keynote speakers
Thursday,
October 26
Kevin Jerome Everson works in film, painting,
sculpture, and photography. His filmic fables, the
focus of this exhibition, articulate the profound
within the ordinariness of everyday life. Everson,
who was born in the working-class community
of Mansfield, Ohio, depicts details in the lives of
people living and working in similar American
communities: a mechanic repairing an old
car in a backyard, a black beauty queen in a
segregated pageant, men boxing, snowplow
operators in winter, young men walking
into a courtroom, the aftermath of a murder.
Some of Everson’s films are constructed from
appropriated news and film footage, uncovering
forgotten details of African-American life in the
1960s and 70s. In other films, the artist explores
the waxing and waning of a community’s sense
of itself and the migration of black people from
the South to the North in order to find work.
Everson, whose work was included in the 2008
Whitney Biennial, approaches race, sexuality,
and economic circumstances with a poetic
yet unflinching eye. Adopting the stance of an
observer, his interest in labor has both a political
and a formal aspect, exploring the relationship
between the human body and the materiality of
the labor it performs as both an expression of
class and identity, and as a performative gesture.
7:30 pm // Berkeley Art Museum
and Pacific Film Archive
Films by
Kevin Jerome
Everson
and Edgar
Arceneaux
Kevin Jerome Everson, Edgar
Arceneaux, and Michael B.
Gillespie in conversation
9
Edgar Arceneaux was born in Los Angeles
in 1972. He investigates historical patterns
through drawings, installations, and
multimedia events, such as the reenactment
of Ben Vereen’s tragically misunderstood
blackface performance at Ronald Reagan’s
1981 Inaugural Gala. In the artist’s work, linear
logic is abandoned in favor of wordplay and
visual associations, revealing how language,
technology, and systems of ordering produce
reality as much as describe them. Seemingly
disparate elements—such as science fiction,
civil rights era speeches, techno music, and
the crumbling architecture of Detroit—find
a new synchronicity in the artist’s hands,
ultimately pointing to larger historical forces
such as the rise of the surveillance state.
Arceneaux’s installations have taken the form
of labyrinths, libraries, multi-channel videos,
and drawn landscapes that change over the
course of an exhibition, only ever offering
a partial view of the whole at any given
moment. This fragmentation extends to the
artist’s use of historical research in his work,
such as FBI documents concerning civil rights
leader Martin Luther King, Jr., where redacted
passages are presented on mirrors that reflect
the viewer’s curious gaze.
Michael B. Gillespie is a film theorist and
historian with an interest in black visual and
expressive culture, film theory, genre, visual
historiography, global cinema, adaptation
theory, popular music studies, and
contemporary art. His recent book, Film
Blackness: American Cinema and the Idea
of Black Film (Duke University Press, 2016)
frames black film alongside literature,
music, art, photography, and new media,
treating it as an interdisciplinary form
that enacts black visual and expressive
culture. The book shifts the ways we
think about black film, treating it not as a
category, genre, or strictly a representation
of the black experience but as a visual
negotiation between film as art and the
discursivity of race.
10
keynote speakers
Friday,
October 27
Rachel Kushner is among America’s most
exciting writers. Her novels and essays explore
contemporary art, culture, revolutionary politics,
modernism, and feminism with unmatched wisdom
and grace.
She has twice been a finalist for the National Book
Award and is a Guggenheim Fellow. Her fiction and
essays appear regularly in the New York Times, The
Paris Review, The Believer, Artforum, Bookforum,
Fence, Bomb, and Grand Street.
Rachel’s first novel, Telex from Cuba, intertwines
revolution in 1950’s Cuba and visceral human
interactions with a revelatory, deft hand. In a
starred review, Kirkus Reviews called it “Soundly
researched and gorgeously written.” A New York
Times bestseller and a finalist for both the National
Book Award and the Dayton Literary Peace Prize, it
was a winner of the California Book Award.
Her incendiary work, The Flamethrowers, was
a finalist for The National Book Award and was
named one of the Top Ten Books of the year by
The New York Times. It is celebrated as a modern
classic. Rachel’s work continues to garner acclaim
among her contemporaries like few other authors
in recent history. In their review The New York
Times proclaimed, “…her prose has a poise and
wariness and moral graininess that puts you in
mind of weary-souled visionaries like Robert Stone
and Joan Didion.”
6–7:30 pm // James Moore Theater,
Oakland Museum of California
Rachel Kushner
in Conversation
with Julia Bryan
Wilson
11
Julia Bryan-Wilson teaches modern and
contemporary art, with a focus on art since 1960 in
the US, Europe, and Latin America; she is also the
Director of the UC Berkeley Arts Research Center. Her
research interests include theories of artistic labor,
feminist and queer theory, performance, production/
fabrication, craft histories, photography, video, visual
culture of the nuclear age, and collaborative practices.
She is the author of Art Workers: Radical Practice in
the Vietnam War Era (University of California Press,
2009); Art in the Making: Artists and Their Materials
from the Studio to Crowdsourcing (with Glenn
Adamson, Thames & Hudson, 2016); and Fray: Art
and Textile Politics (University of Chicago, 2017). With
Andrea Andersson, she curated Cecilia Vicuña: About
to Happen, which opened at the Contemporary Arts
Center New Orleans in 2017 and will travel to the
Berkeley Art Museum, the Henry Art Gallery, and the
ICA in Philadelphia. She is currently writing a book
about Louise Nevelson.
She was a recipient of a Creative Capital/Andy
Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant, and has won
several awards for her teaching. She was the Terra
Foundation Visiting Professor of American Art at the
Courtauld Institute of Art in Spring 2014, and from
fall 2014 to spring 2015 she was a Townsend Center
for the Humanities Associate Professor Fellow. In
2017 she was a Visiting Senior Fellow at the Center
for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National
Gallery in Washington, DC.
12
Thursday, October 26
207 1. Senses of Partition (seminar)
Seminar Organizer: Emma Stapely, University of California, Riverside
Yumi Pak, California State University, San Bernadino
Julia Bloch, University of Pennsylvania
Julie Burelle, University of California, San Diego
Ashon Crawley, University of Virginia
Sarah Dowling, University of Washington, Bothell
Matthew Goldmark, Florida State University
Joo Ok Kim, University of Kansas
Christopher Perreira, University of Kansas
Sunny Xiang, Yale University
201 2. Reassembling the City
Chair: Lee Konstantinou, University of Maryland
Jason Arthur, Rockhurst University, “Carver Country as Toxic Postmetropolis”
Thomas Heise, Penn State University at Abington, “Dreaming New York: The
Displacement of Memory in Teju Cole’s Open City”
Drew Strombeck, Wright State University, “Richard Serra, Gary Indiana, and
the Assemblage of Tilted Arc”
Respondent: Lee Konstantinou, University of Maryland
202 3. Crisis, Community, and the Idea of “Europe”
Chair: Guy Reynolds, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Kate Elswit, The Royal Central School of Speech and Drama, University of
London, “Anti-Nationalism and Love with Europa Europa”
Matthew Liberti, University of Michigan, “Virtual Citizenships: Restorative
Civic Duty in Aleksandar Hemon’s The Lazarus Project”
Nilgun Bayraktar, California College of the Arts, “Performing Non-belonging:
Intersections of Screen Art, Music Video, and Refugee Mobilities”
Guy Reynolds, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, “A Clockwork Orange, Brexit
and Pop: Anthony Burgess’s Quarrel with Mass Culture”
SESSION 1 // 8:30–10AM
13
THURSDAY
203 4. The “Post-Cold War” and the Culture of the Present
Chair: Neda Atanasoski, University of California, Santa Cruz
Sorin Cucu, CUNY, LaGuardia Community College, “Cold-War 2:0?
Holographies of Wonder and Angst”
Anita Starosta, University of Pennsylvania, “Where Was the Cold War?
Circumscriptions from the European Second World”
Shaung Shen, Penn State University at University Park, “Language Politics
from the Perspective of the ‘Post-Cold War’”
Respondent: Neda Atanasoski, University of California, Santa Cruz
California 5. Performance as Pedagogy: Training Audiences for Encounters with
Difference
Chair: Jennifer Brody, Stanford University
Heidi Coleman, University of Chicago, “Sex and Respect on Stage: Failures
of Orientation”
Kyle Frisina, University of Michigan, “Staging Ethical Encounters: Claudia
Rankine’s Citizen: An American Lyric”
Patrick Jagoda, University of Chicago, “Parasitical Pedagogies: Games,
Performance, and Alternate Realities”
Respondent: Jennifer Brody, Stanford University
Junior
Ballroom 1
  1. I Love Chris Kraus
Chair: Rachel Greenwald Smith, St. Louis University
Mitchum Huehls, UCLA, “I Love Dick and the Case Study”
Kim Calder, UCLA, “Becoming Alien, Becoming Impersonal: Chris Kraus’s
Ethic of Decreation in Aliens & Anorexia”
Andrew Marzoni, Georgia Tech, “On the Road Again: Chris Kraus’s Torpor as
Post-Theory Beat Novel”
Respondent: Rachel Greenwald Smith, St. Louis University
SESSION 1 // 8:30–10AM (continued)
14
204 7. Characters without Identity: Emergence, Process, and the Site of the
Subject
Chair: Michael Benveniste, University of Puget Sound
Michael Benveniste, University of Puget Sound, “Constitutive Subjects:
Emergent Character and the Burden of Authenticity in Contemporary
Asian American Literature”
Marco Caracciolo, Ghent University, “Notes for an Anthropocenic Theory of
Character”
John Hegglund, Washington State University, “Space, Sequence, and
Species in Richard McGuire’s Here”
Alexander Catchings, University of California, Berkeley, “Cosmopolitan Point
of View and the Web(site) of the Subject in Open City”
203 8A. Propositions for a New Art Economy (roundtable on prototyping
equitable means for exchange between art workers and the art market)
Chairs: João Enxuto, School of Visual Arts in New York and Erica Love, Independent Artists
Stephanie Boluk, Associate Professor, UC Davis
Patrick LeMieux, Assistant Professor, UC Davis
M.J. Bogatin, Attorney, Bogatin, Corman, and Gold
SESSION 2 // 10:15–11:45AM
Break
SESSION 1 // 8:30–10AM (continued)
THURSDAY
15
201 8. Film In and Out of Place
Chair: Justin Berner, University of California, Berkeley
Lisa Patti, Hobart and William Smith College, “Streaming Women’s Cinema:
Mapping the Locations of Global Women’s Filmmaking in the Era of
Online Distribution”
Anna Schectman, Yale University, “Découpage: From Craft to Film Form”
Leigh Anne Duck, University of Mississippi, “Juke Time: The Noir
Chronotope in Hollywood South”
Junior
Ballroom 1
  1. Varieties of Institutional Experience
Chair: Evan Kindley, Claremont McKenna College
Thom Dancer, University of Toronto, “Matters of Trust”
Kathryn Roberts, Harvard University, “Bespoke Institutions: What Can
Writers’ Colonies tell us about Literary Value(s)?”
Scott Selisker, University of Arizona, “Institution, Network, Game: Dynamics
of the Sellout”
Respondent: Mark McGurl, Stanford University
Junior
Ballroom 4
  1. Arts of the Self: Selfies, Self-Portraits, and Contemporary Art
Chair: Damon R. Young, University of California, Berkeley
Tavia Nyong’o, Yale University, “Lyle Ashton Harris’ Snapshot Sociality”
Nicole Erin Morse, University of Chicago, “Whose Self in the Selfie?:
Posthuman, Networked Selves in Selfies and Self-portraits”
Gary Kafer, University of Chicago, “Believing is Being: Selfies, Referentiality,
and the Politics of Belief in Amalia Ulman’s Instagram”
Elisa Giardina Papa, University of California, Berkeley, “Datafied Bodies”
202 11. Breaking Bonds, Engaging Boundaries
Chair: Matt Hooley, Clemson University
  1. O. Grossman, Stanford University, “Beyond ‘Beyond Borders’”
Joshua Miller, University of Michigan, “Danny Lyon’s Southwestern
‘Photoliterature’: Childhood, Racialized Poverty, and Phototextual
Disguise”
Michelle Ty, Clemson University, “Migration and ‘Receptive Capacity’ of the
Nation-State”
SESSION 2 // 10:15–11:45AM (continued)
THURSDAY
16
California 12. Pacific Racial Time: State, Racial, and Aesthetic Forms
Chair: Sunny Xiang, Yale University
Marci Kwon, Stanford University, “Still Stranded Here on Earth: Martin Wong,
Angels of Light, and Cantonese Opera”
Amber Jamilla Musser, Washington University in St. Louis, “Mimicry,
Fetishism, and the Value of Feminine Aggression”
Ivan Ramos, University of California, Riverside, “Drawing Intimacies: Shizu
Saldamando, Form, and Sonic Relationalities”
Hentyle Yapp, New York University, “Shine Bright Like a Diamond: Fireworks,
Shine, and Post-Socialist Form from Cuba to China”
204 13. Contamination and the Future Form
Chair: Aaron Jaffe, Florida State University
Gloria Chan-Sook Kim, Cornell University, “Speculating the Transnatural
Microbe”
Alison Sperling, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, “Radioactive Tides:
Post-Life After Nuclear Contamination”
Alicia Imperiale, Cornell University, “Triggering Differentiation and Mutation
in Architectural Form”
Respondent: Ron Broglio, Arizona State University
Lunch Break
SESSION 2 // 10:15–11:45AM (continued)
THURSDAY
17
THURSDAY
SESSION 3 // 1–2:30PM
207 14. Impossible Times I (seminar)
Seminar Organizers: Gloria Fisk, Queens College and Sarah Chihaya,
Princeton University
Matt Hart, Columbia University
Jess Hurley, University of Chicago
Caroline Edwards, Birkbeck, University of London
Amy Elias, University of Tennessee
Namwali Serpell, University of California, Berkeley
Sean Grattan, University of Kent
Gloria Fisk, Queens College
Sarah Chihaya, Princeton University
201 15. Media, Atmospherics, and Risk
Chair: Dora Zhang, University of California, Berkeley
Yun Peng, Univ. of Hawai’i Manoa, “Breathing Smog in a Sick Building: Tsai
Ming-liang’s Environmental Poetics “
Zachary Horton, University of Pittsburgh, “Chemtrail’s Particulates as
Multiscalar Cartography”
Hsuan Hsu, UC Davis, “Olfactory Art and Differential Deodorization”
Christopher Miller, University of California, Berkeley, “States of Nature in the
work of Keston Sutherland and Rob Halpern”
202 16. Race and Contemporary Aesthetics
Chair: Kinohi Nishikawa, Princeton University
  1. Dillon Brown, Washington University in St. Louis, “On Not Being Able to
Perform Black Power in Earl Lovelace’s The Dragon Can’t Dance”
Daphne Carr, New York University, “Woop! Woop!: Listening to the Policing
of Black Life through Hip Hop”
Nicholas Sammond, University of Toronto, “Raw. Abject. Resistance”
Stacey Shin, UCLA, “‘Take Root Among the Stars’: Afrofuturist
Environmentalism in Octavia Butler’s Parable Series and the Sculptures of
Cyrus Kabiru”
18
203 17. Poetics in the Present
Chair: Allison Neal, University of California, Berkeley
Rebecca Macmillan, The University of Texas at Austin, “Archiving Place: The
Ethics of Dwelling in the Poetry of Juliana Spahr”
Ben Hickman, University of Kent, “After the Avant-Garde: Vulnerability and
Contemporary Poetry”
Sam Huber, Yale University, “White Poetry in the Place of Politics”
California 18. Feminist Mediums
Chair: Sarah Evans, Northern Illinois University
Jessica Prinz, Ohio State University, “Weaving and Words in the Art of Ann
Hamilton”
Theresa L. Geller, Grinnell College, “The Wages of W.A.R.: Activist
Historiography and the Feminist Art Movement”
Christine Robinson, UCLA, “Pictures for Women: Photographic Provocations
in the Work of Sarah Charlesworth”
Christina Van Houten, New York University, “Ruth Asawa in San Francisco”
Junior
Ballroom 1
  1. The Aesthetics of Social Media
Chair: Aubrey Anable, Carleton University
Ed Finn, Arizona State University, “To Every Art Its Autotune: Beauty in the
Age of Algorithms”
Paul Benzon, Skidmore College, “Digital Melt: Shelley Jackson’s Snow and
the Deep Time of Instagram”
Diana Rosenberger, Wayne State University, “The Fiction of Free Play:
Twitter, Tao Lin, and Aesthetic Judgement in the 21st Century”
204 20. Language, Translation, and Global Scale
Chair: Katherine Ding, University of California, Berkeley
Seo-Young Chu, Queens College, “North Korean Vibes, Korean American
Pronouns”
Anna Ziajka Stanton, The Pennsylvania State University, “Arabic Writing in a
Translatable Present”
Lise-Helene Smith, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona,
“Resistance in Vietnamese American Experimental Poetry”
Tze-Yin Teo, University of Oregon, The Noise of Big Translation
SESSION 3 // 1–2:30PM (continued)
THURSDAY
19
THURSDAY
Break
207 21. Impossible Times II (seminar)
Seminar Organizers: Gloria Fisk, Queens College and Sarah Chihaya,
Princeton University
Aku Ammah-Tagoe, Stanford University
Alexander Manshel, Stanford University
Benjamin Widiss, Hamilton College
Rebecca Walkowitz, Rutgers University
Emily Hyde, Rowan University
Charles Tung, Seattle University
Monika Gehlawat, University of Southern Mississippi
Sarah Evans, Northern Illinois University
California 22. Visual Culture and the Remediation of Black Life Today
Chair: J. Dillon Brown, Washington University in St. Louis
Kinohi Nishikawa, Princeton University, “New Black Book Covers”
Rebecca Wanzo, Washington University in St. Louis, “Blaxploitation Comics
Aesthetics”
Kimberly Juanita Brown, Mount Holyoke College, “Photography and
Melancholia in Toni Morrison’s Jazz”
Hayley O’Malley, University of Michigan, “Museums, Movies, and Toni
Morrison: Bridging Worlds at the Louvre and in Home”
Junior
Ballroom 1
  1. Poetry-Reality-Hunger
Chair: Mark McGurl, Stanford University
Aaron Jaffe, Florida State University, “Poetry as Data Exhaust: The Case of
Ben Lerner”
Andrew Epstein, Florida State University, “Found Language as Fuel:
Appropriation and Reality Hunger in Contemporary Poetry”
SESSION 4 // 2:45–4:15PM
20
201 24. Commodities, c. 1960
Chair: Nicholas Brown, University of Illinois, Chicago
Lisa Siraganian, Southern Methodist University, “Warhol Incorporated, 1957”
Charles Palermo, College of William and Mary, “Marnie’s Jobs, 1964”
Todd Cronan, Emory University, “Eames Feedback, 1960”
Nicholas Brown, University of Illinois, Chicago, “Tropicália, 1968”
Junior
Ballroom 4
  1. Ethics of Protest
Chair: Hertha Sweet Wong, University of California, Berkeley
Nuno Pedrosa, IMMA - Laboratory for Artistic Research, “Challenging the
Museum, Using Works of Art”
Dena Fehrenbacher, Harvard University, “Tone and Representational Ethics:
Palestinians Podcast as a Case Study”
Jesse Matz, Kenyon College, “Montage Diversity: Pepsi-Cola 1969/2017”
Randy Fertel, Fertel Foundation, “Trump as Dionysos: Nothing New Under
the Sun”
202 26. Anatomy of a Door: Temporalities and Ecologies of Architectural
Objects(artists panel)
Chair: Stefanie Sobelle, Gettysburg College
Andy Diaz Hope, Independent Contemporary Artist
Laurel Roth Hope, 2017 Smithsonian Artist Research Fellow, National
Zoological Park
Stefanie Sobelle, Gettysburg College
204 27. The Scale of the Subject
Chair: Rebecca Clark, University of California, Berkeley
Matt Hooley, Clemson University, “Recovery and Opacity: Will Wilson’s
Critical Indigenous Photographic Exchange”
Mark Minch, University of California, Riverside, “Ishi’s Death Mask: Crime
Scene, Portrait, Specimen”
Khury Petersen-Smith, Tufts University, “Women, Children, and Power:
Contrasting representations of Koreans, Japanese, and Okinawans”
Anna C. Cruz, Tufts University, “The Moor as Cultural Praxis: (Re)Inventing
Geographies and Histories through Hip-Hop and Portraiture”
SESSION 4 // 2:45–4:15PM (continued)
THURSDAY
21
THURSDAY
203 28. Community Public Art in an Era of Public Restructuring
Chair: Robin Balliger, San Francisco Art Institute
Rigo 23, San Francisco Art Institute, “Other Forms of Social Interaction in the
Age of Social Media: Art Engaged Socially, Outside of the Shiny Screen”
Ella Diaz, Cornell University, “Was it Ever Just Another Poster?: The Content
& Form of the Protest Poster, 1976 to 2017”
Jesus Barraza, Dignidad Rebelde, “Dignidad Rebelde: Art in Action”
Robin Balliger, San Francisco Art Institute, “Murals in Contested Urban
Space: Appropriating Symbols of Community for Gentrification and Urban
Governance in West Oakland, CA”
SESSION 4 // 2:45–4:15PM (continued)
Break
California 29. Literary Institutions and Literary Labor
Chair: Samuel Cohen, University of Missouri
Harry Stecopoulos, University of Iowa, “‘We’ll be patriotic to more than one
place’: Maxine Hong Kingston, Tripmaster Monkey: His Fake Book, and the
Cultural Cold War”
Laura McGrath, Michigan State University, “Agented Fiction”
Amy Lee, University of California, Berkeley, “The Labors of Literacy in Asian
American Literature”
Lindsay Baltus, University of California, Davis, “We Were Publishers Once:
Print Feminism and Postfeminism in Convergence Culture”
SESSION 5 // 4:30–6PM
22
SESSION 5 // 4:30–6PM (continued)
Junior
Ballroom 1
  1. Disobedient Poetics Redux: Poetry Against Fascism (roundtable)
Chair: Michael Dowdy, University of South Carolina
Daniel Borzutzky, Wilbur Wright College, “Neoliberal Urbanism and Racial
State Violence: Poetries in the Blankest of Times”
Marijeta Bozovic, Yale University, “Second Sex after the Second World:
Socialist Feminisms in Contemporary Russian Poetry”
Susan Briante, University of Arizona, “Documentary Poetics”
Rachel Galvin, University of Chicago, “Contemporary U.S. Poetry”s Critique
of War Culture”
  1. Michael Martinez, University of Colorado Boulder, “How a Name Perceives
a Body”
Teresa Veramendi, Naropa University, “Embodying Power, Oppression, &
Intersectionality”
201 31. Texts and Technologies
Chair: Andrea Quaid, Bard College
Dan Punday, Mississippi State University, “Writing Interfaces in Emergency
Exit”
Alexander Manshel, Stanford University, “The Lag: Technology and Fiction in
the Twentieth Century”
Françoise Sammarcelli, Paris Sorbonne University, “Investigating the
Languages of Collaboration and Hybridization in Today’s Artistic Creation”
Junior 2–3 32. Against Endtimes: Continuity as Critique (roundtable)
Chair: Amy Elias, University of Tennessee
Allison Carruth, University of California, Los Angeles, “Land artists and
resilient ecologies in precarious times”
Jessica Pressman, San Diego State University, “Bookishness: The Afterlife of
Books in the Digital Age”
Rita Raley, University of California, Santa Barbara, “The Afterlife of Machine
Writing”
Rebecca Snedeker, Tulane University, “Timefulness: Procession and
Pilgrimage in 21st-Century Coastal Louisiana”
Cameron Shaw, Pelican Bomb, “What is the Indigenous?”
Amy Elias, University of Tennessee, “Continuity as Resistance: Indie
Futurism”
THURSDAY
23
THURSDAY
SESSION 5 // 4:30–6PM (continued)
204 33. CANCELED
202 34. Apocalypse I
Chair: Jessica Hurley, University of Chicago
Leif Sorensen, Colorado State University, “The Apocalypse is an Inhuman
Story”
Rebecca Evans, Winston-Salem State University, “The Best of Times, the
Worst of Times, the End of Times?: Apocalypse and Generic Hybridity in
the Contemporary Ecological Imagination”
Dan Sinykin, University of Notre Dame, “White Rapture: Evangelism,
Terrorism, Trump”
207 35. “Cranes in the Sky”: Surface, Style, and the Politics of Black Women’s
Contemporary Performance (seminar)
Seminar Organizer: Gayle Wald, George Washington University
Nadia Ellis, University of California, Berkeley
Daphne Brooks, Yale University
Ruth Feldstein, Rutgers University, Newark
Tanisha Ford, University of Delaware
Uri McMillan, UCLA
Samantha Pinto, Georgetown University
Gayle Wald, George Washington University
203 36. Contemporary Art and Modernist Histories
Chair: Meredith Hoy, Arizona State University
Malgorzata Rymsza-Pawlowska, American University, “Presenting the Past:
The Historical Practice of Ant Farm”
Jason Gladstone, The University of Colorado Boulder, “Environmental
Technics: Earthworks Art (c. 1969)”
Daniel Snelson, Northwestern University, “Supertempor.al: Ever the AvantGarde of the Avant-Garde, To Heaven and Beyond!”
renee hoogland, Wayne State University, “The Art of Non-Narrative: Nancy
Mitchnick’s Logic of Painterly Sensation”
24
Films by Edgar Arceneaux and Kevin Jerome Everson,
Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
Keynote | 7:30 PM
THURSDAY // FRIDAY
Friday, October 27
SESSION 6 // 9–10:30AM
Junior
Ballroom 1
  1. The Greatest American Novel of the 21st Century (roundtable)
Chair: Min Song, Boston College
Patricia Stuelke, Dartmouth College
Min Song, Boston College
Sangeeta Ray, University of Maryland, College Park
Lee Konstantinou, University of Maryland, College Park
Molly Geidel, University of Manchester
Respondent: Gordon Hutner, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Junior
Ballroom 4
  1. Cultural Forms and the Language of Finance
Chair: Annie McClanahan, University of California, Irvine
Michelle Chihara, Whittier College, “TED Talks & Ideas Like Currency”
Arne De Boever, California Institute of the Arts, “Automatic Art, Automated
Trading”
Peter Hitchcock, CUNY – Graduate Center, “Abject Financialization and the
Object of Finance”
25
FRIDAY
California 39. Solidity and Solidarity
Chair: Elise Archias, University of Illinois, Chicago
Ken D. Allan, Seattle University, “Mineral Vision(s): W. G. Sebald and Robert
Smithson”
Benjamin Widiss, Hamilton College, “The Realist Flood Plain”
Elise Archias, University of Illinois, Chicago, “The Artist’s Two Bodies”
Blake Stimson, Professor of Art History, University of Illinois, Chicago, “On
Clowning”
202 40. Knowledge and Nature at the Limits of the Present
Chair: Jesse Matz, Kenyon College
Karen Jacobs, University of Colorado Boulder, ““Visualization, Geomancy,
and the Challenge of Knowing HAARP”
Vincent Adiutori, University of Illinois, Chicago, “Neutralizing the Sublime/
Naturalizing the Stuplime: On the Work of Andreas Gursky, Trevor Paglen,
and Theaster Gates”
Torsa Ghosal, California State University, Sacramento, “Plasticity of Archival
Memory: On the Metacognitive Experiences Afforded by Barbara Milman’s
Artists’ Books”
207 41. The Beats and Their Afterlives (seminar)
Seminar Organizer: Steven Belletto, Lafayette College
Regina Weinreich, School of Visual Arts
Jonah Raskin, Sonoma State University
Kirby Olson, SUNY-Delhi
Erik Mortenson, Wayne State University
Polina Mackay, University of Cyprus
Brenda Knight, Independent Researcher
Ronna Johnson, Tufts University
Kurt Hemmer, Harper College
Nancy Grace, College of Wooster
Aaron Goldsman, Emory University
Kristin George Bagdanov, University of California, Davis
Steven Belletto, Lafayette College
Shaun Cullen, Middle Tennessee State University
SESSION 6 // 9–10:30AM (continued)
26
SESSION 6 // 9–10:30AM (continued)
203 42. Curating for Blackness: Towards Black Digital Study (seminar)
Seminar Organizer: Lauren Cramer, Pace University
James Tobias, University of California, Riverside
Alessandra Raengo, Georgia State University
Michele Prettyman Beverly, Mercer University
Charles “Chip” Linscott, Ohio University
Keith Harris, University of California, Riverside
Ezekiel Dixon-román, University of Pennsylvania
Lauren Cramer, Pace University
Derek Conrad Murray, University of California, Santa Cruz
Sarah Jane Cervenak, University of North Carolina at Greensboro
  1. Kameron Carter, Duke University
204 43. The Apocalyptic Imaginary in Post-9/11 Literature and Culture
Chair: Jesús Costantino, University of New Mexico
Charles Sumner, University of Southern Mississippi, “Siege Satisfaction in
Don DeLillo’s Falling Man”
Phillip Grayson, St. John’s University, “‘What it is is, it is what it is’: The
Unconditionally Singular Covenants of Bleeding Edge”
James Rankin, Colorado State University, “‘The People of the Apokalis’: The
Ecoeschatology of Animal’s People”
Jesus Costantino, University of New Mexico, “Fungus, Brains, and Twinkies:
Flavors of Apocalypse”
201 44. Queer Visions
Chair: Will Clark, University of California, Los Angeles
Derrick King, University of Florida, “Nobody Was Supposed to Know:
Racialized Surveillance and Literary Form in the Contemporary Queer
Historical Novel”
Alanna Beroiza, Rice University, “Re-framing Narrative/Gender in the Work of
Chase Joynt”
Jessica Pruett, University of California, Irvine, “Moving in Every Direction:
Boy Bands, Lesbian Aesthetics, and Queer Politics on Stage”
Daren Fowler, Georgia State University, “Becoming Visible, Becoming
Matter: An Aesthetic of Queer Visual Politics”
FRIDAY
27
FRIDAY
Junior
Ballroom 2-3
  1. New Directions in Latin/o American Art: Projects from Pacific Standard
Time LA/LA
Chair: Natalia Brizuela, Associate Professor, UC Berkeley
Tatiana Flores, Associate Professor, Rutgers University, “Relational
Undercurrents: Contemporary Art of the Caribbean Archipelago”
Elena Shtromberg, Associate Professor, University of Utah, “Video Art in Latin
America”
Aleca LeBlanc, Assistant Professor, University of California, Riverside,
“Making Art Concrete: Works from Argentina and Brazil in the Colección
Patricia Phelps de Cisneros”
  1. Ondine Chavoya, Professor, Williams College, “Axis Mundo: Queer
Networks in Latino L.A.”
SESSION 6 // 9–10:30AM (continued)
Break
SESSION 7 // 10:45AM–12:15PM
Junior
Ballroom 1
  1. Afro-Atlantic, Latin/x, and Transpacific Speculations: Radical Traditions
across Deep Time (roundtable)
Chair: Aimee Bahng, Pomona College
Aimee Bahng, Pomona College
Michelle Commander, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Renee Hudson, University of California, San Diego
28
201 47. Artists as Migrants/Migrants as Artists (roundtable)
Chair: Lydia Nakashima Degarrod, California College of the Arts
Juvenal Acosta, California College of the Arts
Pallavi Sharma, California College of the Arts
Carla Pinochet, Universidad Alberto Hurtado
Susan Ossman, University of California, Riverside
Taraneh Hemami, California College of the Arts
California 48. Weaponizing Competencies (roundtable)
Chairs: Jonathan P. Eburne, Pennsylvania State University and
Edgar Schmitz, Goldsmiths, University of London
Courtney D Morris, Pennsylvania State University
Tyler Coburn, Independent Artist
Antek Walczak, Independent Artist
Martín Perna, musician, Antibalas
Simon O’Sullivan, Goldsmiths, University of London
Susan Schuppli, Goldsmiths, University of London
Edgar Schmitz, Goldsmiths, University of London
Jonathan P. Eburne, Pennsylvania State University
202 49. Precarious States and the Work of Art
Chair: Églantine Colon, University of California, Berkeley
Yanhua Zhou, University of Arizona, “Examining the Affective Apparatus of
Rural Society in Mainland China through Socially Engaged Art: A Case
Study of Someone Nearby”
Sara Blair, University of Michigan, “The Afterlife of Analogue: Photography
and the Art of Precarity”
Richard Purcell, Carnegie Mellon University, “20 Feet From Precarity:
Blackness, Music and Work in Contemporary Documentary Film”
Ian Bignall, Rutgers University, “Autonomy on the Dole: Buchi Emecheta and
the Welfare-State Künstlerroman”
SESSION 7 // 10:45AM–12:15PM (continued)
FRIDAY
29
FRIDAY
Junior
Ballroom 4
  1. Criticality and the Pictures Generation
Chair: Anthony Grudin, University of Vermont
Leah Pires, Columbia University, “‘Recognition Maybe, May Not Be Useful’:
Louise Lawler as Double Agent”
Annmarie Perl, Princeton University, “From Criticality’s Invention to its
Association with the Pictures Movement”
Sarah Evans, Northern Illinois University, “The Flesh into Word: David Salle
as Angela Carter’s Moral Pornographer”
Junior
Ballroom 2-3
  1. In a World: Professions and Practices of World Building
Chair: Colleen Lye, University of California, Berkeley
Maria Shivani Bose, Clemson University, “Computational Worldviews in
Contemporary Novels”
J.D. Connor, USC School of Cinematic Arts, “A Magic World at Magic Hour:
Terrence Malick and Jack Fisk in the 70s”
Michael Szalay, University of California, Irvine, “The Return: Twin Peaks, Then
and Now”
Daniel Reynolds, Emory University, “Fumito Ueda’s Ecological World
Building”
204 52. Unexpected Subjects: Girls in Contemporary Visual Culture
Chair: Trista E. Mallory, Whitney Museum of American Art and The New
School
Jen Kennedy, Queens University, “Traffic in Girls”
Angelique Szymanek, Hobart and William Smith Colleges, “Untruthful Girls”
Aliza Shvarts, New York University, “Nonconsensual Collaborations,
2012-Present”
Respondent: Trista E. Mallory, Whitney Museum of American Art and The
New School
SESSION 7 // 10:45AM–12:15PM (continued)
30
SESSION 7 // 10:45AM–12:15PM (continued)
FRIDAY
203 53. State Violence and Visions of Justice
Chair: Emma Stapely, University of California, Riverside
Elizabeth Swanson, Babson College, “Exceptional Space, Everyday Time:
The Problematic of Carceral Space-Time in Mohamedou Ould Slahi’s
Guantanamo Diary”
Diana Ruiz, UC Berkeley, “In the Archives, at the Morgue: Recent Visual
Rhetorics of Political Resistance”
Alex Aubry, Al Nahda/Art of Heritage Collection, “Gulf Voices at the
Intersection of the Arts and Social Justice”
Taiwo Adeto Osinubi,University of Western Ontario, “Queer Life and Prison
Economies of the Human”
12:15-1:30 pm, Skyline Room,
21st Floor, Oakland Marriott City Center
ASAP Members & Awards Lunch
SESSION 8 // 1:30–3PM
201 54. Sound and Difference
Chair: Serena Le, University of California, Berkeley
Tom McEnaney, University of California, Berkeley, “Sonic Revolutions: Tape,
Testimonio, and Electroacoustic Experimentation in Cuba”
David Suisman, University of Delaware, “The Militarization of the Ear: Music
and War-Making from Ancient Greece to LollaFallujah”
Sunny Xiang, Yale University, “Punctuated Sounds: Theresa Hak Kyung Cha’s
Speech Lessons”
Harry Burson, University of California, Berkeley, “Echoes of the
Counterculture: Space, Memory, and Environment in Bay Area Sound Art”
31
FRIDAY
SESSION 8 // 1:30–3PM (continued)
202 55. Contemporary Ireland at the Edge of the Present (roundtable)
Chair: Eric Falci, University of California, Berkeley
Paige Reynolds, College of the Holy Cross
Sarah Townsend, University of New Mexico
Matthew Spangler, San Jose State University
Eric Falci, University of California, Berkeley
208 56. Poetry and Political Action in the Long Crisis (roundtable)
Chair: Margaret Ronda, University of California, Davis
Sarah Brouillette, Carleton University
Christopher Chen, University of California, Santa Cruz
Joshua Clover, University of California, Davis
Elliott Colla, Georgetown University
Walt Hunter, Clemson
Margaret Ronda, University of California, Davis
Junior
Ballroom 2-3
  1. Featured Artist’s Talk:
Favianna Rodriguez in Conversation with Tatiana Flores
203 58. Woke Pedagogies: Teaching Art in/and the Present (roundtable)
Chair: Jacquelyn Ardam, Colby College
Jacquelyn Ardam, Colby College, “Poetry and Politics at the Liberal Arts
College”
Angela C. Bell, Lafayette College, “Pedagogy, Privilege, and Prejudice: We
Need to Talk About Racism”
Will Clark, University of California, Los Angeles, “Teaching Deviance:
Queer Fiction after Marriage Equality, and the Deviant Critique of Gay
Neoliberalism”
Nnekay FitzClarke, Dominican University of California, “Intersecting
Feminism: Race and Privilege in the Liberal Bubble”
Amy R. Wong, Dominican University of California, “Literary Methods and
Critical Media Studies in a Post-Fact Era”
32
Junior
Ballroom 1
  1. After Everything
Chair: Katherine Snyder, University of California, Berkeley
Monica Kaup, University of Washington, “New Ecological Realisms in
Contemporary Post-Apocalyptic Fiction”
Jeremy Rosen, University of Utah, “Bending and Blending Genre:
Lethem’s Gun, with Occasional Music, Westworld, and the Genre Turn in
Contemporary Literary Fiction”
Arthur Wang, Yale University, “Dehumanizing Consent: Sex and Coercion
Across Species”
Heather Hicks, Villanova University, “On Claire Vaye Watkins’s Gold Fame
Citrus and the (Native) American Apocalypse”
204 60. Space: Imaginary/Algorithmic: Texts
Chair: Judith Roof, Rice University
Michael Miller, Rice University, “Algorithmic Authenticity in Joshua Cohen’s
Book of Numbers”
Melissa Bailar, Rice University, “(Anti-)Maps as (Anti-)Art”
Judith Roof, Rice University, “Plains Talk”
Clint Wilson, Rice University, “In No Time Flat: Maps of the Future, Designs
of the Past”
California 61. Genres of the Anthropocene
Chair: Charles Tung, Seattle University
Henry Ivry, University of Toronto, “‘Missives from the mossy margins’: Ruth
Ozeki’s Ecology of Forms”
Emily Watlington, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, “Total Freedom to
Dissovle: Shigeko Kubota’s Video Sculptures”
Benjamin Robertson,The University of Colorado Boulder, “The Stillness of
the Earth: The Anthropocene, Fantasy, and Secondary Worlds”
James Zeigler, University of Oklahoma, “Anthropocene Ecologies and
Comic Book Timing”
SESSION 8 // 1:30–3PM (continued)
FRIDAY
33
FRIDAY
Junior
Ballroom 4
  1. Human Rights and Assemblage in the Afterlives of Empire
Chair: Angela Naimou, Clemson University
Samantha Pinto, Georgetown University, “#developmentgoals: Exposing
Colonialism, Feminism, and Sovereignty in Contemporary African
Diaspora Art”
Crystal Parikh, New York University, “Assembling Iris Chang: Racial Paranoia
and the (After) Lives of Empire”
Alexandra S. Moore, Binghamton University, “Ghost Detainees and Invisible
State Power: Human Rights without Subjects in the Work of Edmund Clark”
Respondent: Angela Naimou, Clemson University
SESSION 8 // 1:30–3PM (continued)
Break
Junior
Ballroom 2-3
  1. Contouring Form: A Look at the Figurative Practices of Chitra Ganesh
(artists panel)
Chitra Ganesh in conversation with Rashmi Viswanathan, New School
University
201 64. Weaponized Media
Chair: Gloria Chan-Sook Kim, Cornell University
Eyal Amiran, University of California, Irvine, “Weaponization, Not Weapons in
Goldberg, Blair, and Almadhoun”
Ranjodh Dhaliwal, University of California, Davis, “Pessimism and Dystopia in
Contemporary Glitch Art and Memes”
Qian Chen, TKWW Media Group (Hong Kong), “The Age of Bullet-curtain:
The Semio-cybernetics of ‘Densely Contexted’ Digital Texts”
SESSION 9 // 3:15–4:45PM
34
SESSION 9 // 3:15–4:45PM (continued)
FRIDAY
Junior
Ballroom 1
  1. The Los Angeles Review of Books at Six (roundtable)
Chair: Sara Marcus, Princeton University
Evan Kindley, Claremont McKenna College
Lee Konstantinou, University of Maryland
Stefanie Sobelle, Gettysburg College
Andrew Hoberek, University of Missouri - Columbia
Sarah Mesle, University of Southern California
Michelle Chihara, Whittier College
California 66. Generation and the Arts of the Present
Chair: C. D. Blanton, University of California, Berkeley
Lawrence Rinder, Director and Chief Curator, Berkeley Art Museum and
Pacific Film Archive, “Presentness in Bay Area Art from the Nineteenth
Century until Now”
James Smethurst, Professor, University of Massachusetts Amherst, “‘What
Time Is It?’: Past and Present in African American Music from Bebop to Hip
Hop”
Barrett Watten, Professor, Wayne State University, “Cultural Logics of
Generation in the Poetics of the Present”
Respondent: Rita Raley, University of California, Santa Barbara
208 67. Towards a Radical Feminist Poetics (roundtable)
Chair: Andrea Quaid, Bard College
Meg Day, Franklin & Marshall College
Tonya Foster, California College of the Arts
Andrea Quaid, Bard College
Mg Roberts, Kelsey Street Press
Lindsay Turner, University of Virginia
Stephanie Young, Mills College
202 68. Intimacy and New Media
Chair: Zara Dinnen, Queen Mary University of London
Sam McBean, Queen Mary University of London, “Anachronistic Technology
in Contemporary Intimate Narratives”
Zara Dinnen, Queen Mary University of London, “On Hacker Intimacies and
Being Close to the Machine”
Rob Gallagher, King’s College London, “‘The game becomes the mediator
of all your relationships’: Networked Intimacy in Nina Freeman’s Cibele”
35
FRIDAY
SESSION 9 // 3:15–4:45PM (continued)
203 69. The Poetics and Politics of Soul (roundtable)
Chair: Walton Muyumba, Indiana University
Ed Pavlić, University of Georgia
Walton Muyumba, Indiana University
Emily Lordi, University of Massachusetts, Amherst
Ayesha Hardison, University of Kansas
204 70. Writing in a Foreign Language
Chair: Joshua Gang, University of California, Berkeley
Jennifer Scappettone, University of Chicago, “Interlingual, Alingual
Apokalupsis: Opacity and/as Disclosure in the Writing of Etel Adnan”
Gabriele Lazzari, Rutgers University, “It’s Igiaba, but it’s also you:” Redefining
Foreignness and Unfluency in Contemporary Italian Literature
Joseph Litvak, Tufts University, “Semi-bilingual: Doing Stand-up Comedy in a
Foreign Language”
Rebecca L. Walkowitz, Rutgers University, “On Not Knowing: Women Writers
and World Literature”
Junior
Ballroom 4
  1. Work Life, Wageless Life
Chair: Joseph Jeon, Pomona College
Jasper Bernes, Stanford University, “Character and Labor in the
Postindustrial Economy”
Annie McClanahan, University of California, Irvine, “Being Fucked and
Getting Fucked Up”
Margaret Ronda, University of California, Davis, “Lyrics of Immobile Life”
Theodore Martin, University of California, Irvine, “Down and Out in Crime
Fiction”
Rachel Kushner in Conversation with Julia Bryan-Wilson
at the James Moore Theater, Oakland Museum of California
Keynote | 6–7:30 PM
36
208 72. Darker than Blue: A Roundtable on Barry Jenkins’s Moonlight and Beyond (roundtable)
Chair: Michael B. Gillespie, The City College of New York (CUNY)
Andreana Clay, San Francisco State University
Emily Lordi, University of Massachusetts, Amherst
Ed Pavlić, University of Georgia
Rizvana Bradley, Yale University
Michael B. Gillespie, The City College of New York (CUNY)
201 73. The Aesthetics and Politics of Logistics
Chair: Alden Sajor Wood, University of California, Irvine
Alden Sajor Wood, University of California, Irvine, “Narrative Logistics:
Cognitive Mapping, Literary Space, and Aesthetic Infrastructure”
Michael W. Wilson, Empire Logistics, “The Operational Dimension”
Ken Ehrlich, California Institute of the Arts, “Networks, Infrastructures,
Logistics: Totalizing and Incomplete Word & Picture Systems”
202 74. The Novel and Its Contemporaries
Chair: Dorothy Hale, University of California, Berkeley
Madigan Haley, College of the Holy Cross: “Novel Endings; Or, Is the Essay
Film actually a Novel?”
Annie Galvin, University of Virginia: “‘If the Light Goes Out’: Excavating
Spaces of State Confinement in War on Terror Art and Fiction”
Cara Lewis, Indiana University Northwest: “The Virtues of Visual Art in the
Contemporary Novel”
SESSION 10 // 8:30–10AM
Saturday, October 28
37
SATURDAY
SESSION 10 // 8:30–10AM (continued)
California 75. Rhythmic Flows: Transmitting the Dancing Body in Zadie Smith’s Swing
Time
Chair: SanSan Kwan, University of California, Berkeley
Brynn Shiovitz, University of California, Los Angeles, “Medium Tempo: The
Transatlantic Circulation of Dance in Zadie Smith’s Swing Time”
Pamela Krayenbuhl, Northwestern University, “Re-Remediating Dance: the
Politics of Body Flows across Swing Times and Platforms” (via Skype)
Jennie Scholick, San Francisco Ballet, “Dancing in the Age of Digital
Reproduction: Reading Dancing in Zadie Smith’s Swing Time”
203 76. Contemporary Girlhood in Words and Images (Seminar)
Seminar Organizer: Laura Finch, University of Michigan
Heather Warren Crow, Texas Tech University
Yuhe Wang, Yale University
Ashley Smith, University of Wisconsin, Madison
Rowan Renee, University of Michigan
Sarah Projansky, University of Utah
Lena Palacios, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities
Hayley O’Malley, University of Michigan
Sherrell Mcarthur, Boston University
Lashawnda Lindsay-Dennis, Wellesley College
Molly Geidel, University of Manchester
Laura Finch, University of Michigan
Samantha Colling, Manchester School of Art
Natalie Clark, Thompson Rivers
Ruth Nicole Brown, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Marissa Brostoff, CUNY, Graduate Center
38
SATURDAY
SESSION 10 // 8:30–10AM (continued)
Junior
Ballroom 1
  1. Spells for the New Resistance (roundtable)
Chair: Evan Kleekamp, Columbia College Chicago
Sheri-Marie Harrison, University of Missouri - Columbia, “Helen Oyeyemi
and the Eschewal of Predictability in Contemporary African Diasporic
Fiction”
Sarah Heston, University of Missouri - Columbia, “Virgo Rituals of the
Millennium, or, How Pacifists Become Armed”
Joanna Luloff, University of Colorado Denver, “The Female Golem: Servant
or Avenger”
Evan Kleekamp, Columbia College Chicago, “Blind Spaces in Can Xue and
Clarice Lispector”
Sarah Zurhellen, Appalachian State University, “An Incantation for Everyday
Magic”
204 78. Genre and Failed Empathy
Chair: Taylor Johnston, University of California, Berkeley
Alissa G. Karl, SUNY Brockport, “Empathize!”
Emily Johansen, Texas A&M University, “On Not Feeling with Others: Open
City and Territorialized Cosmopolitanism”
Davis Smith-Brecheisen, University of Illinois-Chicago, “After the Desert”
Eugenio Di Stefano, University of Nebraska-Omaha, “After the Pink Tide:
Affect and Latin American Film Today”
Junior
Ballroom 4
  1. Affective Recession: Aesthetics and Critique Without Big Feelings
Chair: Tess Takahashi, Independent Researcher and Curator
Aubrey Anable, Carleton University, “What Am I Looking At? Didactic Video
Art in the Age of Informatic Opacity”
James J. Hodge, Northwestern University, “Mindlessness: Autistic Forms of
Self Care in Digital Aesthetics”
Tung-Hui Hu, University of Michigan, “How to Comply with an Algorithm:
The Lethargic Media of Erica Scourti”
Respondent: Tess Takahashi, Independent Researcher and Curator
39
SATURDAY
SESSION 10 // 8:30–10AM (continued)
Junior
Ballroom 2-3
  1. The Work of Reading in the Age of Alternative Facts (roundtable)
Chair: Leila Mansouri, Scripps College
Leila Mansouri, Scripps College, “Inconsistency”
Sarah Blackwood, Pace University, “Self-Help”
Ismail Muhammad, University of California, Berkeley, “Openness”
Jane Hu, University of California, Berkeley, “Genre”
Sarah Mesle, University of Southern California, “Crabbiness”
Aku Ammah-Tagoe, Stanford University, “Relation”
Break
Junior
Ballroom 1
  1. Prehistory of a Museum of Capitalism (curators panel and discussion)
Chair: Christopher Chen, University of California, Santa Cruz
Christopher Chen, University of California, Santa Cruz
Andrea Steves, FICTILIS
Timothy Furstnau, FICTILIS
SESSION 11 // 10:15–11:45AM
40
SATURDAY
SESSION 11 // 10:15–11:45AM (continued)
Junior
Ballroom 2-3
  1. Materiality in Contemporary Art: Compos(t)ing the Past Through the
Present (roundtable)
Chair: Kristin George Bagdanov, University of California, Davis
Sarah Bezan & Hollande Bezan, The University of Alberta/Independent
Artist, “Vegetal Flesh: Decomposing Embodiment in Literature and Art”
Laura T. Smith, Stevenson University, “Somatic Epistemologies as Recovery
Work”
Jennifer Scappettone, University of Chicago, “Materiality of Poetry in the
Age of Digital Reproduction and Ecoprecarity”
Jenni Moody, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, “Nature’s Infinite Book:
Materiality in Erasure Poetry”
Kristin George Bagdanov, University of California, Davis, “Poetic
Remediation”
Jenna Goldsmith, Oregon State University, Cascades, “Compos(t)ition as
Explanation: Gertrude Stein’s New Material in the New Millennium”
California 83. Contexts, (Dis)continuities, and the Arts of Everyday Life (roundtable)
Chair: Lyn Hejinian, University of California, Berkeley
Jill Richards, Yale University
Samia Rahimtoola, Bowdoin College
Daniel Fisher, University of California, Berkeley
Brandon Callender, University of California, Berkeley
Barrett Watten, Wayne State University
Junior
Ballroom 4
  1. The Aesthetics and Politics of Slow (Media) Art
Chair: Mark Goble, University of California, Berkeley
Katja Kwastek, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, “‘Be water, my friend’: Tidal
Rhythms and Oceanic Streams as Metaphors and Agents of Slowness”
Lutz Koepnick, Vanderbilt University, “Unheard of Resonances and
Reverberations: Slowness in Contemporary Sound Art”
Kevin Hamilton, University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign, “Beyond
Abstention: a Slow Aesthetics of Media Participation and Refusal”
41
SATURDAY
SESSION 11 // 10:15–11:45AM (continued)
201 85. Cinematic Horrors
Chair: Lauren Cramer, Pace University
Rosalind Galt, King’s College London, “Pontianak Politics: Gendered
Resistance in the Malay Vampire Film”
Danielle Morgan, Santa Clara University, “‘How Are You Not Scared of This,
Man?’: Get Out and the Literal Horror of Racism”
Rosalind Diaz, University of California, Berkeley, “Bodily Appropriations:
Medicalized Racism, H. P. Lovecraft, and Jordan Peele’s Get Out”
Iggy Cortez, University of Pennsylvania, “Atmospherics of Opacity in Leos
Carax’s Holy Motors”
202 86. Archives, Nostalgia, and Futurity
Chair: Alfonso Fierro, University of California, Berkeley
Ella Elbaz, Stanford University, “Conceiving New Horizons in Contemporary
Israeli and Palestinian Art”
Meredith Hoy, Arizona State University, “Mediated Memory: Refiguring
Nostalgia in Contemporary Art”
Sophia Mao, Harvard University, “Feeling Nostalgia’s Loss, Doing Nostalgia’s
Work in Makoto Shinkai’s Your Name”
Stamatina Dimakopoulou, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens,
“Encounters with the Archive of a “nomadic sage”: Contemporary Greek
Artists on Nicolas Calas” (co-authored with Vassiliki Kolocotroni, University
of Glascow, Tereza Papamichali, Warsaw Academy of Fine Arts)
203 87. The Postsocialist Origins of Post-45: “New” Genres and Subjects in the
1990s
Chair: Steven Lee, University of California, Berkeley
Angela S. Allan, Harvard University, “The Unproductive Artist and the Slacker
Aesthetic”
Christopher T. Fan, University of California, Irvine, “Nerds, Silicon Valley, and
the PMC Participant”
Wendy Allison Lee, Skidmore College, “Margaret Cho and the Failed Family
Sitcom”
Kelly Rich, Harvard University, “The Novel of the Century”
42
SATURDAY
SESSION 11 // 10:15–11:45AM (continued)
204 88. Realism, Genre, and History
Chair: Thom Dancer, University of Toronto
Vincent Haddad, Central State University, “The Social Function of Novelistic
Realism in the Black Lives Matter Movement”
Robert Kilpatrick, Carnegie Mellon University, “Realism, Genre Fiction, and
the Family Politics of Form”
Torleif Persson, Rutgers University, “Remembering John Edgar Wideman’s
Philadelphia Fire”
208 89. Design Cultures
Chair: Justus Nieland, Michigan State University
David Alworth, Harvard University, “Paratextual Art”
Lee Konstantinou, University of Maryland, “Xu Bing’s Big Village”
Respondent: J.D. Schnepf, Harvard University
Lunch Break
SESSION 12 // 1–2:30PM
Junior
Ballroom 2-3
  1. In Terms of Performance (ASAP featured roundtable)
Chair: Shannon Jackson, University of California, Berkeley
Joanna Haigood, Zaccho Dance Theater
Rudolph Frieling, SFMOMA
Uri McMillan, University of California, Los Angeles
Aimee Bahng, Pomona College
Shannon Jackson, University of California, Berkeley
43
SATURDAY
SESSION 12 // 1–2:30PM (continued)
207 91. Revolt, Rethink, Retrench: Feminist Thought and Practice, Late 1970s–
Mid-1980s (seminar)
Seminar Organizer: Sara Marcus, Princeton University
Patricia Stuelke, Dartmouth College
Tamara Spira, Western Washington University
Francisco Robles, University of Notre Dame
Kevin Quashie, Smith College
Sara Marcus, Princeton University
Sam Huber, Yale University
Rachel Ellis Neyra, Wesleyan University
Andy Campbell, University of Southern California
California 92. Situating Formalism (seminar)
Seminar Organizer: Walt Hunter, Clemson University
Gillian White, University of Michigan
Dorothy Wang, Williams College
Prageeta Sharma, University of Montana
Sawako Nakayasu, Poet
Mayumo Inoue, Hitotsubashi University
Walt Hunter, Clemson University
Michael Davidson, University of California, San Diego
  1. D. Carson, University of Virginia
Annie Bolotin, University of Michigan
202 93. Our Everyday Planet, or The Banality of Environmental Evil (seminar)
Seminar Organizer: Melissa Ragain, Montana State University
Lily Woodruff, Michigan State University
Nicole Seymour, Cal State Fullerton
Anjuli Raza Kolb, Williams College
Melissa Ragain, Montana State University
Melanie Micir, Washington University in St. Louis
Margot Lystra, Cornell University
Sarah Kanouse, Northeastern University
Katherine Fusco, University of Nevada
Cheryl J. Fish, Borough of Manhattan Community College
44
SATURDAY
SESSION 12 // 1–2:30PM (continued)
203 94. How to Cut and Share the Global Pie: Transcultural Approaches to
Collaboration, Participation and Activism in Art (seminar)
Seminar Organizers Franziska Koch, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg
and Birgit Hopfener, Carleton University
Mona Schieren, Hochschule für Kunst Bremen
Dorothee Richter, Zürcher Hochschule der Künste
Kerstin Meincke, Universität Duisburg-Essen
Petra Lange-Berndt, Universität Hamburg
Franziska Koch, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg
Birgit Hopfener, Carleton University
Claire Farago, University of Colorado, Boulder
Nanne Buurman, Freie Universität Berlin
208 95. Communities of the Neoliberal
Chair: Alissa G. Karl, SUNY Brockport
J.D. Schnepf, Harvard University, “‘Harlem Do Not Want To Be Stopped From
Exploding’: Census Logic and African-American Literature”
Maria Bose, Clemson University, “Random Walks: Teju Cole and the
Algorithmic Logic of Racial Ascription”
Catherine Liu, University of California, Irvine, “Thinning Social Bonds and
Safe Spaces: Triggered in 2015”
Aaron DeRosa, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, “Market
Sociality and the Neoliberal Brand”
201 96. Reading August Wilson Politically
Chair: Richard Purcell, Carnegie Mellon University
Alan Nadel, University of Kentucky, “‘Can’t Fix Nothing with the Law’: Radio
Golf and the Lesson of the Color Line”
Nathan L. Grant, St. Louis University, “The Price of the Ticket: Civil Rights
Meets Faceless Incivility in August Wilson’s Two Trains Running”
David R. Shumway, Carnegie Mellon University, “August Wilson’s Realism:
Ghosts and History in The Piano Lesson”
Respondent: Richard Purcell, Carnegie Mellon University
45
SATURDAY
Break
Junior
Ballroom 1
  1. Where The Arts Are Now: Theories of the Contemporary
Chair: Michael Szalay, University of California, Irvine
Cameron Bushnell, Clemson University, “The Fully Committed Amateur”
Charles Altieri, University of California, Berkeley, “The Demands of
Contemporaneity on Aesthetic Theory”
  1. John Williams, Yale University, “World Presence: The Spiritual, Corporate,
and Literary Technologies of Being Here Now”
Ann Hall, Louisville University, “Laboratories and Theatre”
203 98. Harun Farocki: The World Made Image
Chair: Jennifer Fay, Vanderbilt University
Homay King, Bryn Mawr College, “An Image Is Being Produced: Procedure
and Cliché in the Films of Harun Farocki”
Domietta Torlasco, Northwestern University, “Soft Montage and the New
Rhythms of (Film) Labor”
Jeffrey Skoller, University of California, Berkeley, “Process as Visual Form in
the Observational Films of Harun Farocki”
Junior
Ballroom 4
  1. Envisioning Blackness: Entanglements of Black Visual Culture
Chair: Donna Jones, University of California, Berkeley
Rizvana Bradley, Yale University, “Glenn Ligon’s ‘Live’: Black Humor’s Edge”
Lisa Uddin, Whitman College, “We’re Going to Have a Ball: Black Spatial
Praxes as Architectural Production”
Michael Gillespie, The City College of New York, “Theme for a Jackal: Notes
on Film Blackness”
Leigh Raiford, University of California, Berkeley, “‘Burning All Illusion’:
Abstraction, Black Aesthetics and the Unmaking of Whiteness”
SESSION 13 // 2:45–4:15PM
46
SATURDAY
SESSION 13 // 2:45–4:15PM (continued)
Junior
Ballroom 2-3
  1. Disposable Bodies: Reading the Figure of the Muslim and the
Refugee in Contemporary Culture
Chair: Zahid R. Chaudhary, Princeton University
Angela Naimou, Clemson University, “Beyond Dread: Horror and the
Speculative Fictions of the Refugee”
Yogita Goyal, University of California, Los Angeles, “The Refugee Crisis and
the Afterlife of Slavery”
Debarati Sanyal, University of California, Berkeley, “Refugee Detention and
the Cinematic Frame”
Respondent: Zahid R. Chaudhary, Princeton University
201 101. Apocalypse II
Chair: Dan Sinykin, University of Notre Dame
Sarah Chihaya, Princeton University, “What is Missing”
Jessica Hurley, University of Chicago, “The Politics of Hopelessness”
Charles Tung, Seattle University, “Apocalyptic Alternativity”
Respondent: Dan Sinykin, University of Notre Dame
202 102. Performing Resistance
Chair: Aku Ammah-Tagoe, Stanford University
Monica Steinberg, University of Southern California, “An Aesthetics of Uncivil
Obedience: Performance Art and the Legal Medium”
Friederike Sigler, Academy of Fine Arts Dresden, “Art Strike and Strike Art”
Mashinka Firunts, University of Pennsylvania, “A Pedagogy of Protest: The
Postwar Lecture-Performance and the Berkeley Free Speech Movement”
California 103. Generations in Contemporary U.S. Fiction
Chair: Mitchum Huehls, University of California, Los Angeles
Kathryn Knapp, University of Connecticut, “Generation Moratorium and the
Contemporary Anti-Bildungsroman”
Jeffrey Williams, Carnegie Mellon University, “The Case for Contemporary
Generations”
Samuel Cohen, University of Missouri, “Better Late Than Never: Prolepsis
and Protest in Generation X”
Respondent: Mitchum Huehls, University of California, Los Angeles
47
SATURDAY
204 104. Perilous Publics: Thinking, Writing, Critiquing for Contemporary Public
Audiences
Chair: John Marx, University of California, Davis
Sheila Liming, University of North Dakota, “Asynchronous Critique: Mark
Greif, Donald Trump, and the Burdens of Timeliness”
Karen Steigman, Otterbein University, “Political Junkie: Joan Didion and the
Narrative of Public Life”
Josh Roiland, University of Maine, “The Private Costs of Public Writing”
Respondent: Benjamin Aldes Wurgaft, Massachusetts Institute of
Technology
208 105. Praxis, Ruptures & New Forms: Discussing Racial Violence and
Contemporary Art (roundtable)
Chair: Eunsong Kim, Northeastern University
Lisa Vinebaum, School of the Art Institute of Chicago
Jennifer Tamayo, Poet and Artist
Eunsong Kim, Northeastern University
Gelare Khoshgozaran, Contemporary Artist
Aram Han Sifuentes, School of the Art Institute of Chicago
Allia Griffin, Santa Clara University
Yelena Bailey, Seattle Pacific University
SESSION 13 // 2:45–4:15PM (continued)
Break
48
SATURDAY
SESSION 14 // 4:30–6PM
Junior
Ballroom 2-3
  1. Commune Editions: “Period Style and the Art of the Present” (jointlyauthored talk)
Chair: Geoffrey G. O’Brien, University of California, Berkeley
Jasper Bernes, Stanford University
Joshua Clover, University of California, Davis
Juliana Spahr, Mills College
201 107. Decolonizing the Nation: Public Art as Site of Protest
Chair: Franziska Koch, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg
Stefanie Snider, Kendall College of Art and Design, “America is Black,
Indigenous, and Muslim: Tatyana Fazlalizadeh’s Public Challenge to White
Nationalism”
Jamie Ratliff, University of Minnesota Duluth, “Queering the Allegory:
Jessica Sabogal’s Women Are Perfect”
Sam Watson, University of Wisconsin Green Bay, “Standing With Standing
Rock in a Checkout Line on Etsy: A Search for Indigenous Voices”
California 108. Anarchist Aesthetics Today (roundtable)
Chair: Robin Blyn, University of West Florida
Abigail Susik, Willamette University
Michael O’Bryan, Washington University
Evelyn Gutierrez, Independent Artist and Activist
Jose Cruz, Independent Artist and Activist
Jesse Cohn, Purdue Northwest
Robin Blyn, University of West Florida
Junior
Ballroom 1
  1. Environmental Design, Systems Thinking, and Modernist Resource
Management
Chair: Weihong Bao, University of California, Berkeley
Jeff Menne, Oklahoma State University, “Hitchcock’s Closed Systems”
Justus Nieland, Michigan State University, “Modernist Resource
Management: The Environmental Design of John McHale”
Jennifer Fay, Vanderbilt University, “Nuclear Design for a ‘Slightly Flawed
Planet’: Edward Teller’s Geographical Engineering”
Brian Jacobson, University of Toronto, “Crude Designs, or the Oil-Built
World”
49
SATURDAY
SESSION 14 // 4:30–6PM (continued)
Junior
Ballroom 4
  1. Race and Economics
Chair: Michelle Chihara, Whittier College
Lynn M. Itagaki, The Ohio State University, “Financial Naturalism: The Slow
Violence of Race and Economics in Showtime’s Billions and Héctor Tobar’s
The Barbarian Nurseries”
Andrew Hoberek, University of Missouri, “Branding and Blackness: Colson
Whitehead’s John Henry Days”
Sheri-Marie Harrison, University of Missouri, “Immigration and Finance in Yaa
Gyasi’s Homegoing and Imbolo Mbue’s Behold the Dreamers”
Dean Itsuji Saranillio, New York University, “’Statehood Sucks: The Present
Consequences of Settler Futures”
208 111. Novel Discussion: George Saunders’ Lincoln in the Bardo (seminar)
Seminar Organizers: Gloria Fisk, Queens College, CUNY and Rachel
Greenwald Smith, St. Louis University
Benjamin Widiss, Hamilton College
Harry Stecopoulos, University of Iowa
Leif Sorensen, Colorado State University
Margaret Ronda, University of California, Davis
Alexander Manshel, Stanford University
Michael LeMahieu, Clemson University
Kathryn Knapp, University of Connecticut
Paul Jaussen, Lawrence Technical University
Rachel Greenwald Smith, St. Louis University
Sean Grattan, University of Kent
Gloria Fisk, Queens College, CUNY
Sara Blair, University of Michigan
Aku Ammah-Tagoe, Stanford University
202 112. Coloring Queer Theory/ Queering Critical Race Studies (roundtable)
Chair: GerShun Avilez, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
GerShun Avilez, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Travis Alexander, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  1. Augustus Durham, Duke University
50
SATURDAY
SESSION 14 // 4:30–6PM (continued)
203 113. The Lyric, Generic Hybridity and Social Action
Chair: Daniel Valella, University of California, Berkeley
Gillian White, University of Michigan, “All The Genres a Scene Could Be’:
Poeticritical Hybrids and Social Hope,”
Brian Glavey, University of South Carolina, “All Happy Families: Generic
Attachments and Normativity in Eve Sedgwick and Maggie Nelson”
Chad Bennett, University of Texas, Austin, “Being Private in Public: Claudia
Rankine and John Lucas’s ‘Situation’ Videos”
204 114. Creativity in Crisis: Artistic Collectivity and Political Engagement
Chair: Elizabeth Ferrell, Arcadia University
Erica Levin, The Ohio State University, “Media Collectivity from Angry Arts to
Blue Tubes”
Elizabeth Ferrell, Arcadia University, “The Ring Around The Rose”
Nicole Woods, University of Notre Dame, “Fluxus (Intra)Media”
grupa o. k. (Julian Myers and Joanna Szupinska),
“A Pseudo Collective Responds”
Join us for a drink in celebration of ASAP/Journal’s first two volumes,
Skyline Room, 21st Floor, Oakland Marriott City Center,
hosted by Pomona College’s Department of English
Closing Reception | 6–7:30PM
51
A
Acosta, Juvenal, 47
Adiutori, Vincent, 40
Aldes Wurgaft, Benjamin, 104
Alexander, Travis, 112
Allan, Angela, 87
Allan, Ken, 39
Altieri, Charles, 97
Alworth, David, 89
Amiran, Eyal, 64
Ammah-Tagoe, Aku, 21, 80, 102,
111
Anable, Aubrey, 19, 79
Archias, Elise, 39
Ardam, Jacquelyn, 58
Arthur, Jason, 2
Atanasoski, Neda, 4
Aubry, Alex, 53
Avilez, GerShun, 112
B
Bahng, Aimee, 46, 90
Bailar, Melissa, 60
Bailey, Yelena, 105
Balliger, Robin, 28
Baltus, Lindsay, 29
Bayraktar, Nilgun, 3
Bell, Angela C., 58
Belletto, Steven, 41
Bennett, Chad, 113
Benveniste, Michael, 7
Benzon, Paul, 19
Berner, Justin, 8
Bernes, Jasper, 71, 106
Beroiza, Alanna, 44
Bezan, Hollande, 82
Bezan, Sarah, 82
Bignall, Ian, 49
Blackwood, Sarah, 80
Blair, Sara, 49, 111
Blanton, C. D., 66
Bloch, Julia, 1
Blyn, Robin, 108
Bogatin, MJ, 8A
Bolotin, Annie, 92
Boluk, Stephanie, 8A
Borzutzky, Daniel, 30
Bose, Maria, 51, 95
Bozovic, Marijeta, 30
Bradley, Rizvana, 72, 99
Briante, Susan, 30
Brizuela, Natalia, 45
Brody, Jennifer, 5
Broglio, Ron, 13
Brooks, Daphne, 35
Brostoff, Marissa, 76
Brouillette, Sarah, 56
Brown, J. Dillon, 16, 22
Brown, Kimberly, 22
Brown, Nicholas, 24
Brown, Ruth Nicole, 76
Burelle, Julie, 1
Burson, Harry, 54
Bushnell, Cameron, 97
Buurman, Nanne, 94
C
Calder, Kim, 6
Callender, Brandon, 83
Caracciolo, Marco, 7
Carr, Daphne, 16
Carruth, Allison, 32
Carson, A. D., 92
Carter, J. Kameron, 42
Catchings, Alexander, 7
Cervenak, Sarah Jane, 42
Chaudhury, Zahid, 100
Chavoya, C. Ondine, 45
Chen, Christopher, 56, 81
Chen, Qian, 64
Chihara, Michelle, 38, 65, 110
Chihaya, Sarah, 14, 21, 101
Chu, Seo-Young, 20
Chua, Charmaine, 73
Clark, Natalie, 76
Clark, Rebecca, 27
Clark, Will, 44, 58
Clay, Andreana, 72
Clover, Joshua, 56, 106
Coburn, Tyler, 48
Cohen, Samuel, 29, 103
Cohn, Jesse, 108
Coleman, Heidi, 5
Colla, Elliott, 56
Colling, Samantha, 76
Colon, Eglantine, 49
Commander, Michelle, 46
Connor, J.D., 51
Conrad Murray, Derek, 42
cortez, iggy, 85
Costantino, Jesús, 43
Cramer, Lauren, 42, 85
Crawley, Ashon, 1
Cronan, Todd, 24
Cruz, Anna, 27
Cruz, Jose, 108
Cucu, Sorin, 4
D
Dancer, Thom, 9, 88
Day, Meg, 67
De Boever, Arne, 38
DeRosa, Aaron, 95
Dhaliwal, Ranjodh, 64
Di Stefano, Eugenio, 78
Diaz, Ella, 28
Diaz, Rosalind, 85
Dimakopoulou, Stamatina, 86
Ding, Katherine, 20
Dinnen, Zara, 68
Dixon-román, Ezekiel, 42
Dowdy, Michael, 30
Dowling, Sarah, 1
Duck, Leigh Anne, 8
Durham, I. Augustus, 112
E
Eburne, Jonathan P., 48
Edwards, Caroline, 14
Ehrlich, Ken, 73
Elbaz, Ella, 86
participant index
52
Elias, Amy, 14, 32
Ellis, Nadia, 35
Ellis Neyra, Rachel, 91
Elswit, Kate, 3
Enxuto, Joao, 8A
Epstein, Andrew, 23
Evans, Rebecca, 34
Evans, Sarah, 18, 21, 50
F
Falci, Eric, 55
Fan, Christopher, 87
Farago, Claire, 94
Fay, Jennifer, 98, 109
Fehrenbacher, Dena, 25
Feldstein, Ruth, 35
Ferrell, Elizabeth, 114
Fertel, Randy, 25
Fierro, Alfonso, 86
Finch, Laura, 76
Finn, Ed, 19
Firunts, Mashinka, 102
Fish, Cheryl J., 93
Fisher, Daniel, 83
Fisk, Gloria, 14, 21, 111
FitzClarke, Nnekay, 58
Flores, Tatiana, 45, 57
Ford, Tanisha, 35
Foster, Tonya, 67
Fowler, Daren, 44
Frisina, Kyle, 5
Furstnau, Timothy, 81
Fusco, Katherine, 93
G
Gallagher, Rob, 68
Galt, Rosalind, 85
Galvin, Rachel, 30
Galvin, Annie, 74
Ganesh, Chitra, 63
Gang, Joshua, 70
Gehlawat, Monika, 21
Geidel, Molly, 37, 76
Geller, Theresa L., 18
George Bagdanov, Kristen, 41,
82
Ghosal, Torsa, 40
Giardina Papa, Elisa, 10
Gillespie, Michael, 72, 99
Gladstone, Jason, 36
Glavey, Brian, 113
Goble, Mark, 84
Goldmark, Matthew, 1
Goldsman, Aaron, 41
Goldsmith, Jenna, 82
Goyal, Yogita, 100
Grace, Nancy, 41
Grant, Nathan, 96
Grattan, Sean, 14, 111
Grayson, Phillip, 43
Greenwald Smith, Rachel, 6, 111
Griffin Allia, 105
Grossman, C O, 11
Grudin, Anthony, 50
grupa, o. k., 114
Gutierrez, Evelyn, 108
H
Haddad, Vincent, 88
Hale, Dorothy, 74
Haley, Madigan, 74
Hall, Ann, 97
Hamilton, Kevin, 84
Han Sifuentes, Aram, 105
Hardison, Ayesha, 69
Harris, Keith, 42
Harrison, Sheri-Marie, 77, 110
Hart, Matt, 14
Hegglund, Jon, 7
Heise, Thomas W., 2
Hejinian, Lyn, 83
Hemami, Taraneh, 47
Hemmer, Kurt, 41
Heston, Sarah, 77
Hickman, Ben, 17
Hicks, Heather, 59
Hitchcock, Peter, 38
Hoberek, Andrew, 65, 110
Hodge, James, 79
hoogland, renee, 36
Hooley, Matt, 11, 27
Hope, Andy, 26
Hopfener, Birgit, 94
Horton, Zachary, 15
Hoy, Meredith, 36, 86
Hsu, Hsuan, 15
Hu, Tung-Hui, 79
Hu, Jane, 80
Huber, Sam, 17, 91
Hudson, Renee, 46
Huehls, Mitchum, 6, 103
Hunter, Walt, 56, 92
Hurley, Jessica, 14, 34, 101
Hyde, Emily, 21
I
Imperiale, Alicia, 13
Inoue, Mayumo, 92
Itagaki, Lynn, 110
Ivry, Henry, 61
J
Jacobs, Karen, 40
Jacobson, Brian, 109
Jaffe, Aaron, 13, 23
Jagoda, Patrick, 5
Jaussen, Paul, 111
Johansen, Emily, 78
Johnson, Ronna, 41
Johnstong, Taylor, 78
Jones, Donna, 99
K
Kafer, Gary, 10
Kanouse, Sarah, 93
Karl, Alissa, 78, 95
Kaup, Monika, 59
Kennedy, Jen, 52
Khoshgozaran, Gelare, 105
Kilpatrick, Robert, 88
Kim, Gloria, 13, 64
Kim, Eunsong, 105
Kim, Joo Ok, 1
Kindley, Evan, 9, 65
King, Homay, 98
King, Derrick, 44
Kleekamp, Evan, 77
Knapp, Kathryn, 103, 111
Knight, Brenda, 41
Koch, Franziska, 94, 197
Koepnick, Lutz, 84
Konstantinou, Lee, 2, 37, 65, 89
53
Krayenbuhl, Pamela, 75
Kwan, SanSan, 75
Kwastek, Katja, 84
Kwon, Marci, 12
L
Lange-Berndt, Petra, 94
Lazzari, Gabriele, 70
Le, Serena, 54
LeBlanc, Aleca, 45
Lee, Amy, 29
Lee, Wendy, 87
Lee, Steven, 87
LeMahieu, Michael, 111
LeMieux, Patrick, 8A
Levin, Erica, 114
Lewis, Cara, 74
Liberti, Matthew, 3
Liming, Sheila, 104
Lindsay-Dennis, Lashawnda, 76
Linscott, Charles “Chip”, 42
Litvak, Joseph, 70
Liu, Catherine, 95
Lordi, Emily, 69, 72
Love, Erica, 8A
Luloff, Joanna, 77
Lye, Colleen, 51
Lystra, Margot, 93
M
Mackay, Polina, 41
Macmillan, Rebecca, 17
Mallory, Trista, 52
Manshel, Alexander, 21, 31, 111
Mansouri, Leila, 80
Mao, Sophia, 86
Marcus, Sara, 65, 91
Martin, Theodore, 71
Martinez, J. Michael, 30
Marx, John, 104
Marzoni, Andrew, 6
Matz, Jesse, 25, 40
Mcarthur, Sherrell, 76
McBean, Sam, 68
McClanahan, Annie, 38, 71
McEnaney, Tom, 54
McGrath, Laura, 29
McGurl, Mark, 9, 23
McMillan, Uri, 35, 90
Meincke, Kerstin, 94
Menne, Jeff, 109
Mesle, Sarah, 65, 80
Micir, Melanie, 93
Miller, Joshua, 11
Miller, Christopher, 15
Miller, Michael, 60
Minch, Mark, 27
Moody, Jenni, 82
Moore, Alexandra, 62
Morgan, Danielle, 85
Morris, Courtney D., 48
Morse, Nicole Erin, 10
Mortenson, Erik, 41
Muhammad, Ismail, 80
Musser, Amber, 12
Muyumba, Walton, 69
N
Nadel, Alan, 96
Naimou, Angela, 62, 100
Nakashima Degarrod, Lydia, 47
Nakayasu, Sawako, 92
Neal, Allison, 17
Nieland, Justus, 89, 109
Nishikawa, Kinohi, 16, 22
Nyong’o, Tavia, 10
O
O’Brien, Geoffrey G., 106
O’Bryan, Michael, 108
O’Malley, Hayley, 22, 76
O’Sullivan, Simon, 48
Olson, Kirby, 41
Osinubi, Taiwo Adetunji, 53
Ossman, Susan, 47
P
Pak, Yumi, 1
Palacios, Lena, 76
Palermo, Charles, 24
Parikh, Crystal, 62
Patti, Lisa, 8
Pavlić, Ed, 69, 72
Pedrosa, Nuno, 25
Peng, Yun, 15
Perl, Annmarie, 50
Perna, Martín 48
Perreira, Chri,stopher, 1
Persson, Torleif, 88
Petersen-Smith, Khury, 27
Pinochet, Carla, 47
Pinto, Samantha, 35
Pires, Leah, 50
Pressman, Jessica, 32
Prettyman, Beverly, Michele
42
Prinz, Jessica, 1
Projansky, Sarah, 76
Pruett, Jessica, 44
Punday, Dan, 31
Purcell, Richard, 49, 96
Q
Quaid, Andrea, 31, 67
Quashie, Kevin, 91
R
Raengo, Alessandra, 42
Ragain, Melissa, 93
Rahimtoola, Samia, 83
Raiford, Leigh, 99
Raley, Rita, 32
Ramos, Ivan, 12
Rankin, James, 43
Raskin, Jonah, 31
Ratliff, Jamie, 107
Ray, Sangeeta, 37
Raza Kolb, Anjuli, 93
Renee, Rowan, 76
Reynolds, Guy, 3
Reynolds, Paige, 55
Reynolds, Daniel, 51
Rich, Kelly, 87
Richards, Jill, 83
Richter, Dorothee, 94
Rigo 23, 28
Rinder, Lawrence, 66
54
Roberts, Mg, 67
Roberts, Kathryn, 9
Robertson, Benjamin, 61
Robinson, Christine, 18
Robles, Francisco, 91
Roiland, Josh, 104
Ronda, Margaret, 56, 71, 111
Roof, Judith, 60
Rosen, Jeremy, 59
Rosenberger, Diana, 19
Roth Hope, Laurel, 26
Ruiz, Diana, 53
Rymsza-Pawlowska, Malgorzata,
36
S
Sammarcelli, Françoise, 31
Sammond, Nicholas, 16
Sanyal, Debarati, 100
Saranillio, Dean Itsuji, 110
Scappettone, Jennifer, 70, 82
Schieren, Mona, 94
Schmitz, Edgar, 48
Schnepf, J.D., 89, 95
Scholick, Jennie, 75
Schuppli, Susan, 48
Selisker, Scott, 9
Serpell, Namwali, 14
Seymour, Nicole, 93
Sharma, Pallavi, 47
Sharma, Prageeta, 92
Shaw, Cameron, 32
Shechtman, Anna, 8
Shen, Shuang, 4
Shin, Stacey, 16
Shiovitz, Brynn, 75
Shtromberg, Elena, 45
Shumway, David, 96
Shvarts, Aliza, 52
Sigler, Friederike, 102
Sinykin, Dan, 34, 101
Siraganian, Lisa, 24
Skoller, Jeffrey, 98
Smethurst, James, 66
Smith, Ashley, 76
Smith, Laura, 82
Smith, Lise-Helene, 20
Smith-Brecheisen, Davis, 78
Snedeker, Rebecca, 32
Snelson, Daniel, 36
Snider, Stefanie, 107
Snyder, Katherine, 59
Sobelle, Stefanie, 26, 65
Song, Min, 37
Sorensen, Leif, 34, 111
Spahr, Juliana, 106
Spangler, Matthew, 55
Sperling, Alison, 13
Spira, Tamara, 91
Stapely, Emma, 1, 53
Starosta, Anita, 4
Stecopoulos, Harry, 29, 111
Steigman, Karen, 104
Steinberg, Monica, 102
Steves, Andrea, 81
Stimson, Blake, 39
Strombeck, Drew, 2
Stuelke, Patricia, 37, 91
Suisman, David, 54
Sumner, Charles, 43
Susik, Abigail, 108
Swanson, Elizabeth, 53
Sweet Wong, Hertha, 25
Szalay, Michael, 51, 97
Szymanek, Angelique, 52
T
Takahashi, Tess, 79
Tamayo, Jennifer, 105
Teo, Tze Yin, 20
Tobias, James, 42
Torlasco, Domietta, 98
Townsend, Sarah, 55
Tung, Charles, 21, 61, 101
Turner, Lindsay, 67
Ty, Michelle, 11
U
Uddin, Lisa, 99
V
Valella, Daniel, 113
Van Houten, Christina, 18
Veramendi, Teresa, 30
Vinebaum, Lisa, 105
Viswanathan, Rashmi, 63
W
Wald, Gayle, 35
Walkowitz, Rebecca, 21, 70
Wang, Yuhe, 76
Wang, Arthur, 59
Wang, Dorothy, 92
Wanzo, Rebecca, 22
Warren, Crow, Heather, 76
Watlington, Emily, 61
Watson, Sam, 107
Watten, Barrett, 66, 83
Weinreich, Regina, 41
White, Gillian, 92, 113
Widiss, Benjamin, 21, 39, 111
Williams, Jeffrey, 103
Williams, R. John, 97
Wilson, Michael, 73
Wilson, Clint, 60
Wong, Amy, 58
Wood, Alden, 73
Woodruff, Lily, 93
Woods, Nicole, 114
X
Xiang, Sunny, 1, 12, 54
Y
Yapp, Hentyle, 12
Young, Damon, 10
Young, Stephanie, 67
Z
Zeigler, James, 61
Zhang, Dora, 15
Zhou, Yanhua, 49
Ziajka Stanton, Anna, 20
Zurhellen, Sarah, 77
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